What Is A Class B Commercial Driver’S License? (TOP 5 Tips)

Class B CDL This license allows the driver to operate any vehicle with a GVWR greater than 26,000 pounds, as well as any vehicle towing a trailer that does not exceed a GVWR of 10,000 pounds.

What is a Class B commercial?

  • Class B CDL Description. A Class B CDL allows a driver to operate commercial trucks that have an attached cab and cargo area with a combined weight greater than 26,000 pounds, as well as trucks with a detached towed cargo vehicle that weighs less than 10,000 pounds.

What is the difference between CDL A and B?

If you are pulling a commercial trailer that weighs over 10,000 pounds (most commercial trailers do), you will need a CDL-A. Combination vehicles, such as tractor trailers or semi-trailers, always meet the requirements for CDL-A. A CDL-B is typically only for lighter vehicles, such as a straight truck or bus.

What is a commercial Class B?

A Class B CDL lets you drive a single vehicle weighing 26,001 pounds or more without a trailer. It also allows you to operate any vehicle towing a trailer that weighs less than 10,000 pounds. The following types of vehicles may be driven with a Class B: Straight trucks. Dump trucks with small trailers.

Is Class B considered commercial?

What is a Class B CDL? A Class B commercial driver’s license is required to operate a single vehicle with a gross combination weight rating of 26,001 or more pounds, or tow a vehicle not heavier than 10,000 pounds.

What are the requirements for a Class B CDL?

One of the basic requirements for any CDL Class B License is that the candidate needs to be a minimum 21 years of age and be able to pass the eye exam. Besides this, he/she should posses a valid state License. Drivers who have moving violations are strictly prohibited from applying to this license.

How long does it take to get a Class B CDL?

The Class B CDL course is the shortest program of the three, it only takes 3-weeks to complete. Having a Class B CDL will allow you to operate a tow truck, dump truck, delivery truck and many more!

What are the four types of licenses?

Different Driver’s License Types

  • Class D. Although it may seem odd to jump into the middle of the alphabet to start, a Class D license is the most common type of driver’s license.
  • Junior License (DJ)
  • Commercial Driver’s License (Class A, B, and C)
  • Taxi and Livery (Class E)
  • Motorcycles.

What is a Class B driver’s license UK?

The category B licence lets you drive a motor vehicle with a maximum weight of up to 3,500kg, it can’t have more than eight passenger seats. If you want to use a trailer the most it can weigh without additional hassle is 750kg.

What does class C stand for?

Class C. Authorizes an individual to drive: Single vehicle or combination of vehicles that are not included in Class A or B. Single vehicle with a GVWR of less than 26,001 pounds towing a farm trailer with a GVWR that does not exceed 20,000 pounds.

What is a Class C?

A Class C is a motorhome built with a cab or cut-away chassis. A cab/cut-away chassis provides a front structure that looks like a van, including seats, a dash, opening doors, and body sheet metal. Many people like the Class C because it is familiar to their own automobile.

What is the difference between Class A and Class B?

A class A license is considered the “universal” CDL, providing the opportunities for driving several different types of commercial trucks and tractor trailers. A class B license also allows operation of different types vehicles such as straight trucks and dump trucks, but it is more limiting than a class A CDL.

What is a Class B license in Texas?

Class B – Permits the holder to operate any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 pounds or more, any one of those vehicles towing a vehicle that does not exceed 10,000 pounds GVWR, and any vehicle designed to transport 24 passengers or more, including the driver.

How much is a Class B license in California?

$70.00 for Commercial Class B.

What is a Class D license?

Different driver’s licenses can be used to operate different classes of vehicles. The most common is the passenger (Class D) license, which allows you to legally operate a passenger vehicle, van or small truck.

What state has the easiest CDL test?

So, if you’re still wondering what the easiest state to get a CDL in is, just know it includes Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Indiana, and South Carolina, because that’s where our schools are located.

Can you get a CDL with a DUI?

You will be able to obtain a CDL even if you have a DUI already on your driving record. However, you may be able to get a CDL, but you will likely struggle to find an employer who would want to give you a driving job as a commercial driver with a DUI on your driving record.

What’s the Difference Between a Class A and Class B Commercial Driver’s License?

While pursuing a career as a truck driver with Prime Inc., you’ll have the chance to earn competitive wages and take advantage of a variety of great benefits. Every time you get behind the wheel, you’ll be taking on a significant amount of duty, including the burden of delivering your goods on time while also keeping the roads safe for everyone. Unlike driving a standard consumer automobile, truck, or van, operating a commercial vehicle necessitates a greater degree of ability. Truck drivers, as well as individuals who operate other commercial vehicles for a living, such as straight trucks or buses, are required to have a commercial driver’s license, also known as a CDL by the federal government.

  • In possession of a vehicle that weighs a total of more than 26,001 pounds (excluding trailers)
  • Hauling a trailer with a gross weight in excess of 10,000 pounds
  • Driving any vehicle with a seating capacity of 16 or more persons
  • The transportation of potentially hazardous items

Class A, Class B, and Class C CDLs are available to drivers of commercial vehicles because to the fact that different types of commercial vehicles demand varying levels of competence and knowledge. Here is a breakdown of the requirements and cars that you can drive under each classification, with special emphasis on the significant distinctions between Class A and Class B vehicles.

Different Types of Commercial Driver’s Licenses

You will need a different form of CDL depending on the type of vehicle you intend to drive. An overview of the various CDL classes, as well as the vehicles that may be operated with each of them, is provided below.

  • You will be permitted to operate a combination of vehicles, such as a semi-tractor and trailer, if the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the combined vehicles is 26,001 pounds or greater if you obtain a Class A CDL. It also permits you to tow a trailer weighing 10,000 pounds or more with your vehicle. It is possible to secure special endorsements for certain categories of cargo, such as hazardous items, that must be transported. It is permissible to drive the following types of cars with a Class A:
  • Truck pulling a tractor-trailer, often known as a semi-truck, a big rig, or an 18-wheeler Tractor trailer buses
  • Truck and trailer combos, including double and triple trailers
  • Truck and trailer combinations
  • Vehicle-mounted tankers Vehicles with flatbeds
  • According to endorsement standards, the majority of Class B and Class C cars
  • Class B CDL permits you to drive one vehicle that weighs 26,001 pounds or more without the use of a trailer. This license also enables you to drive any vehicle capable of hauling a trailer weighing less than 10,000 pounds. It is permissible to drive the following types of cars with a Class B:
  • Straight trucks
  • Large buses, such as city buses, tourist buses, and school buses
  • Segmented buses
  • Box trucks, such as delivery trucks and furniture trucks
  • Straight trucks
  • Straight trucks Trucks with tiny trailers for dumping waste
  • Class C automobiles with the appropriate endorsements are available
  • The Class C CDL applies to cars that do not fall under the purview of the Class A or B CDLs. When operating vehicles that transport 16 or more passengers, including the driver, as well as some smaller vehicles that transport hazardous items, this license is required.

Comparing the Class A and Class B CDL

A Class A CDL has a number of advantages over a Class B CDL, including the fact that it is necessary for operating a big rig. There are often more occupations available that need a Class A than there are positions available that demand a Class B. For example, if you acquire your Class A CDL while enrolled in the Prime, Inc. training program and satisfy their standards, you will be assured employment as a corporate driver. Other benefits of obtaining a Class A CDL include the following:

  • The earning potential of jobs needing a Class A degree is often higher. It is the favored option for the majority of drivers who wish to pursue a long-term career on the road
  • In addition, it allows the driver to operate a wider range of commercial vehicles. The ability to travel greater distances and view more of the nation is often provided through this feature.

Because there are fewer Class B jobs available, the market for these positions is extremely competitive. Drivers may choose for a Class B commercial driver’s license in the following situations:

  • The driver has a certain work in mind for which he only requires a Class B vehicle. Trucking is seen as a temporary position before transitioning to a more permanent position. Specifically, the driver wishes to work inside a more restricted geographic scope, such as a particular metro region or state.

Are you interested in pursuing a career as a truck driver in the trucking industry? Then you’ll need to get your Class A commercial driver’s license. Prime Inc. provides a driver training program to help you prepare for your Class A CDL exam so that you may learn the abilities you’ll need to operate the commercial vehicle that you intend to drive for the company. Are you ready to go forward with the next step? Check your eligibility now to discover if you qualify to join training and begin your journey to truck driving success!

Call (866) 290-1568 right now.

Types of CDL Licenses: A, B, and C Licenses Covered

If you want to drive large, heavy, or placarded hazardous material trucks in the United States for business purposes, you’ll need a commercial driver’s license (CDL). There are various distinct types of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) that require a driver to have a valid commercial driver’s license in order to operate them safely. CDL drivers with one of these license classes are in high demand among employers, therefore we recommend that you obtain the license class you require before applying for your ideal job.

For example, you can drive trucks that contain flammable liquids, explosives, or radioactive substances if your endorsement is Passenger (P).

To be eligible for an endorsement, you must first pass a specialized knowledge exam and, if applicable, a specialized driving skills examination.

In order to receive a S endorsement, you must also submit to a rigorous background investigation. Get professionalCDL training from the convenience of your own home – provided by an ELDT provider who has been approved by the FMCSA. Guaranteed to pass.

CDL License Classes Overview (March 2022):

Type of License Description Vehicles You May Drive
Class A CDL Required to operate any combination of vehicles with a gross combination weight rating (GVWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, provided the towed vehicle is heavier than 10,000 pounds. Tractor-trailers (also known as Semi, Big Rig or 18-wheeler), Truck and trailer combinations, Tanker vehicles, Livestock carriers, Flatbeds. Most Class B and Class C vehicles, depending on endorsement requirements
Class B CDL Required to operate any single vehicle that isn’t hitched to a trailer (commercial trucks that have an attached cab and cargo area with a combined weight greater than 26,000 pounds, as well as trucks with a detached towed cargo vehicle that weighs less than 10,000 pounds). Straight trucks, Large buses (city buses, tourist buses, and school buses), Segmented buses, Box trucks (including delivery trucks and furniture trucks), Dump trucks with small trailers. Some Class C vehicles with the correct endorsements.
Class C CDL Required to operate a single vehicle with GVWR of less than 26,001 pounds or a vehicle towing another vehicle that weighs less than 10,000 pounds, or transports 16 or more passengers, including the driver. Double/Tripe Trailers, Buses, Tank Trucks, HazMat Vehicles

The following is a list of all of the Commercial Driver’s License courses available.

What is a Class A CDL?

In order to operate any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GVWR) of 26,001 pounds or more, a Class A commercial driver’s license is necessary, provided that the towed vehicle weighs more than 10,000 pounds. Having a Class A CDL and the appropriate endorsements allows you to operate the following types of commercial vehicles:

  • Tractor-trailers, truck-and-trailer combos, tank vehicles, livestock carriers, and flatbeds are all examples of commercial vehicles.

The following image is courtesy of: tractor-trailer with flatbed trailer Your CDL Class A license may also enable you to drive some Class B and Class C vehicles if you have the appropriate endorsements.

What is a Class B CDL?

If you are driving a single vehicle with a gross combined weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more, or if you are towing a vehicle not weighing more than 10,000 pounds, you will need a Class B commercial drivers license. You can operate the following types of trucks with a Class B CDL and the proper endorsements:

  • Straight trucks, large passenger buses, segmented buses, box trucks, dump trucks with tiny trailers, tractor-trailers, and other types of vehicles

A young guy boards a passenger bus operated by the Houston Area Rapid Transit (HART) (image credit) Your Class B CDL may also allow you to operate select Class C vehicles if you have the appropriate endorsements on your license.

What is a Class C CDL?

The use of any commercial vehicle designed to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) or to transport hazardous materials (HazMat), which are items that are defined as dangerous under federal law, necessitates the possession of a Class C commercial driver’s license. The following types of vehicles are permissible to drive with a Class C CDL and the appropriate endorsements:

  • Small HazMat vehicles, passenger vans, and combination vehicles that are not protected by Classes A or B are examples of vehicles that fall into this category.
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Sodium Hydroxide Solution transported in a HazMat tanker truck (image credit)

What is a Commercial Driver’s License (CDL)?

To operate commercial motor vehicles (CMVs), such as tractor-trailers, semi-trucks, dump trucks, and passenger buses, you must have a Commercial Driver’s License. If you want to work on the road rather than in an office, you’ll almost certainly require a commercial driver’s license. It is determined by the type of CDL you hold that the types of vehicles you are licensed to drive are classified as follows: Class A, Class B, and Class C. The gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle, as well as other special regulations, are also taken into consideration in CDL categorization.

Prior to 1986, however, several states let anybody with an automobile driver’s license to operate a commercial motor vehicle.

The Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Act was signed into law on October 27, 1986, by President Ronald Reagan.

In addition to guaranteeing that bus drivers and big truck operators receive extensive training and certification, this law has made a substantial contribution to increased highway safety.

Applicants seeking a Class A or Class B commercial driver’s license, or an H, P, or S endorsement, will be required to complete training from FMCSA-approved training providers listed in the FMCSA Training Provider Registry as of that date if they wish to be considered for a CDL or an H, P, or S endorsement (TPR).

What is a Commercial Learner’s Permit (CLP)?

A commercial learner’s permit (CLP) is a permit issued by your state that allows you to get experience driving a commercial motor vehicle while still in school. In order to obtain a commercial driver’s license, you must first complete the CLP application process.

How to Get a CDL

The normal minimum age to apply for a CDL is 21 years old. Some states, however, enable drivers between the ages of 18 and 20 to apply for a CDL that is valid in only one state. A single-state CDL permits a driver to operate a commercial vehicle exclusively inside the state in which the driver resides (intrastatedriving). When the driver reaches the age of 21, the limitation is immediately lifted. You may apply for a CDL at your local Department of Motor Vehicles office. To earn a commercial driver’s license, you must follow tight federal rules, and each state has its own set of regulations that must be satisfied as well.

How To Obtain Class B CDL License

A Commercial Driver’s License, most usually abbreviated as CDL, is a driver’s license that allows a person to operate a truck or a bus in commercial situations. ACDLis a door opener for everyone who want to pursue a career as a commercial vehicle driverDMVCheatSheets.com.

Types ofCDLLicense

  • DMV CheatSheets.com defines Class A as a vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of more than 26,001 pounds, whereas Class B is defined as any vehicle that can tow another vehicle weighing less than 10,000 pounds and has a GVWR of more than 26,001 pounds. Straight trucks, huge buses, segmented buses, and trucks are examples of vehicles that fall within the Class BDMVCheatSheets.com category. Due to the fact that you are not permitted to drive heavy tractors that pull 10,000 pounds or more, this is a limited license. Vehicle or combination of vehicles that does not fall within the classification of Class A or Class B, but is designed to transport 16 or more passengers, including the driver, and/or is placarded for the transportation of hazardous items (Class C). DMVCheatSheets.com

Department of Motor Vehicles

However, while there are Federal guidelines for the same, each state has its own rules, which are very effectively regulated by the Department of Motor Vehicles in each state, which is a federally mandated agency. The test is rather demanding, since it consists of a written examination as well as three separate skill examinations. As a result, obtaining a decent education is quite important. At the DMV, they provide adequate training to ensure that you grasp the essential Federal regulations and provide instructions that are tailored to your specific demands, such as budgetary constraints.

Whatever option you choose, the DMV will work hard to provide you with complete assistance.

Procedure to obtain Class BCDLLicense

To be eligible for a CDLClass B License, the applicant must be at least 21 years old and pass an eye examination. Aside from that, he or she should be in possession of a current state license. Drivers with moving infractions are not eligible to apply for this license and will be denied admission. You will need to pass the General Knowledge examination, the Basic skills test, the Air-brakes test, the Pre-trip inspection, and any additional tests that may be required to obtain a Class BCDLlicense.

  1. In some states, you may be required to relinquish your out-of-state driver’s license.
  2. FeesWhen filing for a CDLClass B permit, there is a set amount of money that must be paid to cover the cost of the learner’s permit, the written exam, and the skills test, all in one go.
  3. Study and learn the general knowledge questionsYou must study and memorize the general knowledge questions in order to pass the stateCDLClass B tests.
  4. DM To assist you with preparing for the CDLclass B exam, Valso includes a list of practice questions and a sample of the CDLclass B exam in the handbook.
  5. In order to take the exam on the same day that you submit your CDLapplication, you need have previously registered for the exam while submitting your CDLapplication.
  6. SubmitCDLapplication In addition, they will provide all of the appropriate exam sheets, which will contain multiple choice questions as well as true or false questions that are related to operating a Class B vehicle.
  7. Upon successful completion of the exam, you will be sent to the next counter where you will be awarded a learner’sCDL for Class B vehicles.

Get some driving experience with a CDLLearners permit.

5.

You may either go to the DMV in person or make an appointment to take the exam.

6.

During this practical examination, you will be required to travel with the light duty truck and inspect it as well as do a driving test in which you will be driving the light duty truck together with the examiner.

After passing the abilities exam, you will be issued a temporary license slip that will be good for about one month.

You will receive your CDLY.

Having endured all of the stress and effort, you are finally prepared to operate your light-duty vehicle with your Class BCDLlicense in hand.

Commercial Driver’s Licenses

To handle heavy vehicles in a safe manner, it is necessary to have specialized knowledge, training, and ability. We offer commercial driver’s licenses (CDLs) to guarantee that drivers fulfill our stringent requirements for operating commercial motor vehicles on public roads. CDL applicants that are enrolled in Entry Level Driver Training (ELDT) include: The Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) introduced federal Entry Level Driver Training (ELDT) requirements for commercial driver’s license (CDL) applicants on February 7, 2022, with effect from the date of implementation.

In order to be considered for admission on or after February 7, 2022, candidates must successfully complete the ELDT.

  • In order to obtain a new CDL (Class A or B), you must first obtain a Class B CDL and then upgrade it to a Class A CDL. You may also obtain an endorsement for school buses (S), passengers (P), or hazardous materials (H).

As an additional requirement, when applying for an original CDL (Class A or B) in California, the applicant must complete a minimum of 15 hours of behind the wheel training and submit a California Commercial Driver Behind The Wheel Training Certification (DL 1236) to the DMV as proof of completion before their CDL can be issued. The DMV will issue a CDL to the applicant once they have submitted a California Commercial Driver Behind The Wheel Training Certification (DL 1236) to the DMV. Please see this website for further information about ELDT.

  • Frequently asked questions about ELDT for both applicants and training providers are included below.
  • If you are 21 years old or older, you can be hired to drive a commercial motor vehicle that transports hazardous materials or waste across state lines.
  • What exactly qualifies as a CMV?
  • The following is the procedure for applying for a CLP:
  • To begin, you must get a normal California noncommercial Class C driver’s license (DL) (a temporary or interim DL is permitted). Fill out an online CDL Application form
  • Visit a DMV office, where you will be able to do the following:
  • Completed10-Year History Record Check (DL 939) (if you have been awarded a driver’s license of any sort in another state or jurisdiction during the previous 10 years)
  • A completedMedical Examination Report (MER) Form (MCSA 5875) and a completedMedical Examiner’s Certificate (MEC) Form (MCSA 5876) (see the “Medical examination report” section below for further details)
  • And Please provide documentation proving your social security number (SSN). While you are at the office, your information will be checked with the Social Security Administration. Verify your identity by presenting a valid identification document. Your current name must be the same as the name on your identification document (for further information, read the FAQs)
  • And Present appropriate proof of residency (if you have never had a California driver’s license or identity (DL/ID) card)
  • And Pay the nonrefundable application cost (both the application and the fee are valid for 12 months). Have your thumbprint captured and scanned
  • Pass the eyesight test
  • Make an appointment to have your picture taken. Pass the knowledge test with flying colors (s). Each of the needed knowledge examinations can be passed three times if you do not make a mistake. If you fail the same exam three times, your application is no longer valid, and you must submit a new application for consideration. We do not conduct knowledge examinations within 30 minutes of the end of the day to ensure that enough time is available for testing. You must also present proof of your identification, your social security number (SSN), and two proofs of residency from the list of eligible REAL ID papers if you wish to apply for aREAL ID.

After you have passed the knowledge test, we will give you a CLP (s). If you do not satisfy all of the requirements to obtain a CDL within 12 months of applying (including passing both the knowledge exam and the skills test), your application will be deemed invalid and you will be required to reapply.

Rules and Restrictions

The following are the requirements and limits that apply to operating a CMV while holding a CLP:

  • In addition, you must obtain and maintain a valid California driver’s license. When granted, the CLP is valid for a total of 180 days from the date of issuance. It is possible to renew it for an extra 180 days if the expiration date is less than one year after the date of the first application. If you produce legal presence documents that are only valid for a short period of time, your CLP may expire on the same date as your legal presence documents. A CLP is restricted to the following endorsements:
  • When operating a commercial motor vehicle in California, you must be accompanied by a CDL holder. To operate a commercial motor vehicle, the license holder must have the proper class of CDL and endorsements. When operating a commercial motor vehicle with a “N” endorsement, the tanks must be completely empty. If the tank previously housed a potentially dangerous material, it must be emptied. In order to operate a commercial motor vehicle with passengers (apart from federal/state auditors and inspectors, test examiners, other trainees, and the accompanying CDL holder), you must have either a “P” or “S” endorsement.

Applicants who have had a commercial learner’s permit (CLP) for at least 14 days can apply to take the skills exam required to acquire their commercial driver’s license (CDL).

It also applies to classification upgrades and endorsement/restriction modifications that necessitate a skills exam, which are subject to the 14-day waiting period. To apply for a CDL, follow these steps:

  • Make an appointment for a skills evaluation (skills tests are not given without an appointment). Make an appointment by calling 1-800-777-0133 during regular business hours (8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Tuesday, Thursday through Friday, and between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Wednesday, except holidays) or by visiting the website. Bring the sort of vehicle(s) you wish to drive for the class you want to be in. You must pass the skills exam, which consists of a vehicle inspection, a test of fundamental control abilities, and a road test. If you fail any section of the skills test, you will be required to retake the test at a later date. To pass the skills exam, you have three chances to do so. Each time you retake the abilities exam, you will be required to pay a retest charge.

Certain candidates may be eligible to have the skills test requirement waived, including but not limited to:

  • In the event that you hold an active CDL from another state that has not expired or has not expired for more than two years, you may be able to relinquish that license (or proof thereof). The license must have the same classification, endorsements, and limits as the one you are asking for in California
  • And it must be issued in the same state. If your company has the authority to issue Certificates of Driving Skill (DL 170 ETP), you may be able to submit one. The paperwork must be signed by both you and your employer. A Commercial Military Waiver can be submitted if you have previous military driving experience (DL 965). Learn more about the Troops to Trucks military waiver program by visiting their website. If you hold a California commercial driver’s license and have finished CDL training and passed the skills exam in another state, you are not needed to take the skills test in the state of California. The results of your abilities exam will be transmitted to the California Department of Motor Vehicles from the state where you took the test. To complete your application, you will need to visit a DMV Commercial Driving Test Office in your area. If you do not return to a commercial DMV office within 30 days, your application may be considered expired.
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You’ll be issued an interim CDL that will be valid for 60 days after you successfully complete your skills exam, relinquish your out-of-state CDL, or submit your certificate. If you have not received your official CDL within 45 days, please contact us at 1-800-777-0133 to inquire about the status of your application.

Commercial Driver’s License Renewal

It is possible that you will be eligible to renew your commercial driver’s license through the Virtual Field office if your license expires in fewer than 120 days and it is not suspended or lost.

CDL ClassesCertifications

The Employer Testing Program (ETP) grants permission to eligible commercial businesses to give the CDL driving test to their workers who are in need of a CDL certification. Learn more about the program, including its prerequisites and application process. Find out more about the ETP.

Sample CDL Knowledge Tests

Before you can apply for a commercial driver’s license, you must first complete the necessary knowledge examinations, which demonstrate that you understand the regulations of the road and how to operate a commercial motor vehicle safely. These practice exams will assist you in preparing for your knowledge examination. Make use of the sample tests to get some practice.

What Classifies as a CMV?

A commercial motor vehicle (CMV) is defined as a motor vehicle or combination of vehicles and trailers that is hired out for the purpose of transporting passengers or property.

  • The weight of a single vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of at least 26,001 pounds
  • • a combination of vehicles with a gross combination weight rating (GCWR) of at least 26,001 pounds A vehicle that is built, operated, or maintained for the transportation of more than 10 passengers (including the driver) at a time A vehicle hauling another vehicle or trailer having a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of at least 10,000 pounds
  • A truck that transports hazardous products (which must be marked with placards)
  • In accordance with Sections 25115 and 25117 of California Health and Safety Code, a vehicle transporting hazardous waste
  • In this case, the vehicle is pulling either a combination of two trailers or a vehicle and a trailer A three-axle truck with a gross weight of more than 6,000 pounds

Need something else?

The EPN program enables businesses to keep track of the driving history of their employees and contractors.

Update Info on Your Driver’s License (DL) or ID Card

Learn how to make changes to your driver’s license or identification card, such as changing your name, address, or gender.

REAL ID cards

Beginning on May 3, 2023, you’ll be required to provide a federally compatible card, such as a passport, military ID, or REAL ID, in order to board a domestic aircraft or get access to certain government buildings.

Commercial Driver’s License Classes & Certifications

CDLs are classified into three categories:

  • If the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle(s) being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds, a commercial A combination is any legally combined grouping of vehicles with a gross combination weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 pounds or more. Commercial B: Any single vehicle having a gross vehicle weight rating of more than 26,000 pounds, any such vehicle towing a vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating of less than 10,000 pounds, or any three-axle vehicle weighing more than 6,000 pounds
  • Vehicles in the commercial category are defined as any Class C vehicle that has one or more of the following endorsements:
  • Hazardous Materials (HazMat)
  • Passenger Vehicles (PV)
  • Tank Vehicles (TV)
  • And other terms and phrases

All CDL classes are offered as a REAL IDcompliant or a federal non-compliant card, depending on your preference. Consult the California Commercial Driver Handbook for further information on which classes you may be eligible for and the criteria associated with each class.

Commercial Operation Self-Certification

Commercial drivers are required to certify the type of commercial activity they are participating in under the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulation (383.71), which can be classified as Non-Excepted Interstate, Non-Excepted Intrastate, Excepted Interstate, or Excepted Intrastate. Fill out a California Commercial Driver License Self-Certification Form (DL 694) and either send it to the address on the form or bring it to any DMV office to have your self-certification status updated on your driver record.

Non-Excepted Interstate (NI)

You operate or intend to operate a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) in interstate commerce and you fulfill the standards of Title 49, CFR, part 391 of the Code of Federal Regulations.

The license does not impose any restrictions on the mode of transportation, the point of origination, or the final destination of the load being transported. Interstate commerce is defined as any trade, travel, or transportation that takes place within the United States (U.S.).

  • Between a location inside a state and a location outside of that state (which may include a location outside of the United States)
  • Between two points in a state that passes via another state or a location outside of the United States
  • Between two points in a state as part of trade, traffic, or transportation that originates or terminates outside of the state or the United States of America

It’s vital to remember that even if your car does not leave the state, you may be considered to be participating in interstate trade. If you fulfill the federal requirements and there is any possibility that you may operate a commercial motor vehicle in interstate commerce, we highly advise you to certify a driving kind of NI with us.

Non-Excepted Intrastate (NA)

You operate or intend to operate a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) in intrastate commerce and you fulfill the standards of Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, part 391. Both the freight and the people must be transported through California. While driving for business purposes, you are not permitted to cross state or international boundaries. You will have a CDL Intrastate Only limitation (40/K) on your CDL card and driving record if you self-certify that you are operating in North America (NA).

Excepted Interstate (EI) and Excepted Intrastate (EA)

Some states offer CDLs without requiring drivers to complete the requirements listed in Title 49, CFR, part 391 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Drivers who fall into this category are referred to as “excepted.” These sorts of CDLs are not issued in the state of California. Drivers who are licensed to operate commercial motor vehicles in California are considered non-excepted drivers.

Drivers

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Overview

Commercial driver’s licenses (CDLs) have been necessary in order to operate certain commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) since the first day of April in 1992. The sorts of vehicles and operations that necessitate the use of a CDL are listed below. In order to ensure the safety of commercial drivers, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has created and released guidelines for state testing and licensing of commercial drivers. Specifically, these standards require states to only issue CDLs to certain commercial motor vehicle drivers after the driver has passed knowledge and skills exams performed by the state and that are applicable to the type of vehicle the driver plans to operate, among other requirements.

When a CDL holder performs the abilities exam in a vehicle that does not include key equipment found in specific types of commercial motor vehicles, restrictions are put on the CDL.

As a result, drivers should take the skills exam in the same type of vehicle for which they are seeking a CDL in order to avoid any restrictions.

This applies to drivers who want to do the following:

  • Obtaining a Class A or Class B CDL for the first time
  • Upgrading an existing Class B CDL to a Class A CDL
  • Or obtaining a school bus (S), passenger (P), or hazardous materials (H) endorsement for the first time are all options available.

The ELDT rules provide a Federal standard for training CDL candidates that is consistent across the country. Prior to being authorized to sit for the CDL skills exam or, in the case of the H endorsement, to sit for the knowledge test, applicants must satisfactorily complete this course with a licensed training provider.

Through the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s Training Provider Registry, drivers may find a training provider (). More information may be found on the page devoted to entry-level driver training.

Classes of License and Commercial Learner’s Permits (CLP)

According to federal regulations, states give CDLs and CLPs to drivers who meet the qualifications for the following license classifications: a towed unit(s) with a gross vehicle weight rating or gross vehicle weight of more than 4,536 kilograms (10,000 pounds), whichever is greater, and a gross combination weight rating or gross combination weight of 11,794 kilograms (26,001 pounds), whichever is greater, is included in the gross vehicle weight rating or gross vehicle weight of more than 4,536 kilograms (10,000 pounds), whichever is greater.

The following vehicles are classified as Class B*: Any single vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating or a gross vehicle weight of 11,794 kilograms (26,001 pounds) or more, or any such vehicle towing a vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating or a gross vehicle weight that does not exceed4,536 kilograms (10,000 pounds).

Code 5103 and is required to be placarded under subpart F of 49 CFR Part 172, or is transporting any quantity of a material listed as a select agent or toxin in 42 CFR Part 73.

Endorsements and Restrictions

In order to have any of the following endorsements placed on their CDL, drivers who operate particular types of CMVs must complete extra examinations. These tests include:

T

Combination of tank vehicle and hazardous materials endorsements (Knowledge test only)

S*

School Bus (Knowledge and Skills Tests)
CLP Endorsements – Only 3 endorsements are allowed on the CLP

P

Passenger, A CLP holder with a “P” endorsement is prohibited from operating a CMV carrying passengers, other than Federal/state auditors and inspectors, test examiners, other trainees, and the CDL holder accompanying the CLP holder as prescribed by 49CFR383.25(a)(1).

S

School Bus, A CLP holder with an “S” endorsement is prohibited from operating a school with passengers, other than Federal/state auditors and inspectors, test examiners, other trainees, and the CDL holder accompanying the CLP holder as prescribed by 49CFR383.25(a)(1).

N

Tank Endorsement, A CLP holder with an “N” endorsement may only operate an empty tank vehicle, and is prohibited from operating any tank vehicle that previously contained hazardous materials that have not been purged of any residue.

Restrictions

If the driver does not pass the Air Brakes Knowledge Test, does not correctly identify the air brake system components, does not properly conduct an air brake systems check, or does not take the Skills test in a vehicle with a full air brake system, the driver must have an “L” no full air brake restriction placed on their license.

Z

If the driver takes the test in a vehicle with an air over hydraulic brake system, then they will have a “Z” no full air brake restriction placed on their license. In either case the driver is not authorized to operate a CMV equipped with full air brakes.

E

If the driver takes the Skills Test in a vehicle that has an automatic transmission, then an “E” no manual transmission restriction is placed on their license.

O

If the driver takes the Skills Test in a Class A vehicle that has a pintle hook or other non-fifth wheel connection, they will have an “O” restriction placed on their license restricting them from driving any Class A vehicle with a fifth wheel connection.

M

If a driver possesses a Class A CDL, but obtains his or her passenger or school bus endorsement in a Class B vehicle the State must place an “M” restriction indicating that the driver can only operate Class B and C passenger vehicle or school buses.

N

If a driver possesses a Class B CDL, but obtains his or her passenger or school bus endorsement in a Class C vehicle; the State must place an “N” restriction indicating that the driver can only operate Class C passenger vehicle or school buses.

V

If the State is notified by the FMCSA that a medical variance has been issued to the driver, the State must indicate the existence of such a medical variance on the CDLIS driving record and the CDL document using a restriction code “V” to indicate that there is information about the medical variance on the CDLIS record.

*If a driver is looking to earn a CDL or endorsement for the first time, they must complete entry-level driver training. More information may be found on the page devoted to entry-level driver training. When it comes to CDL endorsements and limits, states may have a more restricted category for a class of license, or extra codes for endorsements and restrictions on CDLs that are not included in federal laws, as long as these elements are adequately disclosed on the license document. The most recent update was made on Tuesday, February 8, 2022.

Class A versus Class B CDL: What’s the Difference?

In order to make an informed decision about which CDL to pursue, it might be beneficial to understand the differences in the training, expertise, and vehicle specs necessary for each class of CDL. This frequently begins with determining the type of vehicle you desire to operate, which is a critical decision that may influence whatever commercial driver’s license (CDL) you choose to pursue. There are three different types of CDL: Drivers with a class A commercial driver’s license are referred to as “universal” CDLs since they may operate numerous different types of trucks and tractor trailers with their license.

Among the distinctions between CDL kinds are the sorts of vehicles used and the weight of those vehicles, as well as the amount of weight carried by the vehicles and the cargo that they will pull.

What is a Class A CDL?

It is necessary to have a class A CDL in order to operate a combination of vehicles (such as a tractor and trailer) with a gross vehicle weight of at least 26,001 pounds and a towing capacity of at least 10,000 pounds. This is the more encompassing CDL, allowing for the operation of what most people describe to as “big rigs” or “18-wheelers,” as well as other types of commercial vehicles. Having a class A CDL that has been properly enhanced with appropriate endorsements should allow you to operate the majority of commercial motor vehicles, including class B and class C vehicles.

What Is the Training for a Class A CDL?

Training for a class A CDL can vary depending on which program you choose to enroll in. It may include hands-on and behind-the-wheel instruction, vehicle maintenance, federal and state regulations training, and other components that can teach students how to safely drive and operate a class A vehicle, according to the Department of Transportation. A motorist who is interested in operating a variety of different commercial motor vehicles may want to consider getting a class A CDL. New England Tractor Trailer Training School (NETTTS) provides a variety of differentclass A CDL training choices for drivers of various experience levels, including those with no prior experience.

What Is a Class B CDL?

It is necessary to have a class B commercial driver’s license (CDL) to operate a single vehicle that has a gross vehicle weight of 26,001 pounds or more and a towing capability of no more than 10,000 pounds. Class B vehicles are often not equipped with a trailer. A Class B CDL, when combined with the appropriate endorsements, permits the operator to operate a variety of vehicles, including straight trucks, buses, trash trucks, dump trucks, delivery trucks, and cement mixers. With the appropriate endorsements on a Class B CDL, it is possible to drive Class C vehicles as well.

What Is the Training for a Class B CDL?

Learning to drive with a class B CDL is normally accomplished via a combination of classroom and hands-on experience. Classes will vary according on the program, but may cover topics such as basic information, training requirements, vehicle handling, drafting trip reports, exam preparation, and practice driving on the range and on the open highway. Additionally, course work and training may include vehicle inspections, railroad crossings, freight hauling, as well as general CDL and vehicle expertise.

The CDLB 80 license program is administered by NETTTS.

What Are CDL Endorsements?

Endorsements are available for each type of CDL license and are necessary for drivers who wish to operate certain vehicles or transport specific types of cargo. Endorsements are also available for commercial driver’s licenses. In order to operate specified types of commercial vehicles, drivers must pass endorsement examinations. These include double or triple tractor trailers, school buses, passenger vehicles transporting 16 or more passengers, hazardous vehicles, and tankers.

In certain cases, endorsements can provide CDL drivers with additional options to move a greater variety of commodities in a number of various types of vehicles.

Making the Best Choice of CDL

For prospective truck drivers, determining which class of commercial driver’s license to obtain might be a good starting point. It is from there that they may determine how to put together a plan to achieve their objectives. NETTTS is here to assist you in understanding your options and in determining your next actions. Contact us now. For further information on the various programs for class A and class B training, please contact NETTTS.

Mike Demars

Mike Demars has been in the trucking industry for 28 years and is a graduate of the New England Tractor Trailer Training School. He has clocked well over a million miles on the road during his career. Former owner and operator of a long haul transportation firm, Mike has over a decade of experience managing drivers as a Driver Manager and Safety Director. Prior to joining the company, Mike worked as a Safety Director for our Connecticut sites. He has attained the rank of Master Instructor and possesses a Certificate in Collision Avoidance, and he is frequently sought for as an industry expert to discuss best practices in the field and to testify in transportation and trucking concerns.

What is the Main Difference Between CDL-A and CDL-B? – Midwest Technical Institute

Is a job in the transportation business something you’re considering? Alternatively, does your work need you to possess a Commercial Driver’s License, sometimes known as a CDL? Being aware of the primary differences between the CDL-A and CDL-B licenses can assist you in determining which license you will need to obtain in order to become a commercial truck driver. First and foremost, it is essential to understand the technical definitions of CDL-A and CDL-B: To put it another way, if your commercial vehicle weighs more than 26,000 pounds (excluding trailers), you must have a Commercial Drivers License, often known as a CDL, in order to operate it.

If you are towing a commercial trailer that weighs more than 10,000 pounds (which is the case for most commercial trailers), you will require a CDL-A endorsement.

A CDL-B is normally reserved for smaller, lighter vehicles, such as straight trucks and school buses.

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What Can You Do with a Class A Commercial Driver’s License?

If being on the open road rather than behind a desk seems like your idea of a thrilling profession, try pursuing a Class A commercial driver’s license. In order to operate certain vehicles like as semi-trucks, tractor-trailers, and buses since 1986, you must have a commercial driver’s license (CDL). The Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Act was passed by the federal government in order to promote highway safety as well as to specify the minimum qualifications for a CDL license.

Individual states, on the other hand, are responsible for issuing licenses and setting their own regulations. Learn more about how to obtain a commercial driver’s license in the sections below.

Types of Commercial Driver’s Licenses

Class A, Class B, and Class C commercial driver’s licenses are the three most common categories of commercial driver’s licenses. Typically, a Class A CDL permits the driver to operate any vehicle that is towing a semi-trailer or a trailer with two or more axles in the majority of states Additionally, any combination of vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating larger than 26,000 pounds may be included in this category, provided that the gross vehicle weight rating of the towed vehicle is greater than 10,000 pounds is included.

Essentially, the difference between a class A and a class B commercial driver’s license is that a Class B CDL allows the driver to operate any heavy straight truck with a gross vehicle weight rating greater than 26,000 pounds, and any vehicle towing another vehicle with a weight rating of not more than 10,000 pounds.

How to Get a Commercial Driver’s License

Candidates must pass both a practical and written exam in order to get a commercial driver’s license (CDL). It is highly suggested that you complete a training course before trying the examinations unless you have prior experience operating a commercial vehicle. Examine the regulations in your state to ensure that you understand them before choosing a training course, as there may be significant differences across regions. As an example, in Pennsylvania, a commercial driver’s license (CDL) is required for anyone who drives a vehicle that transports 16 or more passengers, including the driver, as well as any vehicle transporting hazardous materials, whereas in California, a driver must have a CDL if their primary employment is driving, regardless of whether or not they drive a commercial vehicle.

Career Opportunities in Commercial Truck Driving

Earning a Class A CDL opens the door to a wide range of employment prospects with a number of trucking businesses. In addition to having a valid driver’s license, some businesses require rookie drivers to complete a set number of “ride along” hours with an experienced truck driver to understand the ins and outs of the routes and loading procedures. Alternatively, if you have accumulated the necessary distance, you may consider setting up shop as your own transportation firm. A higher degree of knowledge, experience, and physical ability is required to operate a commercial motor vehicle than is required to operate a personal automobile.

Visit the website of your state’s Department of Motor Vehicles to discover more about the requirements for a Class A CDL in your state, as well as information on CDL training and permit test preparation options.

Instructors benefit from field experience, full-size equipment, and the chance for students to accumulate the driving hours required to finish their CDL training at McCann’s Class A Tractor Trailer program.

Please visit this page to learn more about McCann’s CDL Training: Class A Tractor Trailer* curriculum and to see a map of our training facilities. It is not possible to get Title IV financing for CDL training in a Class A tractor trailer since it falls beyond the scope of ACICS accreditation.

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Class B vehicle is defined as a single-unit vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating greater than 26,000 pounds. If you utilize a large or unusually large vehicle for the road test, your license may be restricted in some way. If the CMV used for testing does not have air brakes, you will be prohibited to driving only vehicles that do not have air brakes, even if you passed the air brake knowledge exam on the first try. Changes to the Commercial Learner’s Permit (CLP) requirements were effective on May 4, 2015.

  • Successfully complete a(multiple) knowledge test(s)
  • And, possess a valid Minnesota driver’s license.

Additionally, starting on May 4, Minnesotans will be required to provide the following documents in order to be considered:

  • Proof of citizenship or legal permanent status is required (U.S. passport, birth certificate, permanent residency card). For those whose legal names have changed in the United States (such as those listed on their passport or birth certificate), they must additionally provide documentation of the change (s). Certified marriage certificates, certified divorce decrees, and other certified court orders are all examples of evidence that is acceptable. The name change must be specified in the divorce decree or other court procedures. A strong relationship between your citizenship or permanent residency papers and your present name must be demonstrated in your identification and names change documentation
  • If appropriate, a valid Medical Examiner Certificate must be shown.

Prior to completing the CDL road exam, CLP holders will be required to have their permit in their possession for a period of 14 calendar days (The 14-day waiting period will not apply to those who received their CLP between now and May 1). Those who have a CLP will be subject to the same disqualifying offenses as those who hold a CDL. This includes the use of alcoholic beverages, the use of illegal drugs, and traffic offenses. Changes to the Commercial Driver’s License (CDL)

  • In addition, beginning in July, CDL holders renewing their license will be required to present proof of citizenship or permanent residency
  • Additional limits on commercial vehicles used for the CDL road test will be implemented on May 4, 2015, and will include the following:
  • It will not be permissible for drivers taking the CDL test in a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) with an automatic gearbox to operate a commercial motor vehicle with a conventional transmission. Unless a driver passes the road test in a tractor-semi-trailer, he or she will be confined to other Class A vehicle combinations. In order to acquire a passenger or school bus endorsement, drivers must pass a road test in which they are restricted to a specific bus size.

*The need for proof of citizenship Drivers renewing their commercial driver’s license (CDL) will be needed to present one of the documents on the following list that satisfies the criteria for evidence of citizenship beginning on July 1, 2015.

  • A valid, unexpired United States Passport or passport card
  • A certified copy of a birth certificate from any state in the United States
  • A Consular Report of Birth Abroad issued by the United States Department or state
  • A Certificate of Naturalization or Certificate of Citizenship issued by the United States Department of Homeland Security
  • A valid, unexpired Permanent Resident Cardor
  • An unexpired employment authorization document issued by USCIS
  • Or an unexpired foreign passport accompanied

If the name on the aforementioned document differs from the current name on the CDL, the client must additionally provide documentation of the legal name change to the driver’s license bureau (s). Certified marriage certificates, certified divorce decrees, and other certified court orders are all examples of evidence that is acceptable. The name change must be specified in the divorce decree or other court procedures. It is necessary for identity and name change paperwork to demonstrate a clear connection between the citizenship or permanent residence document and the present name on the document.

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