What Is The Driver’S License Compact?

The Driver License Compact is an interstate compact used by States of the United States to exchange information concerning license suspensions and traffic violations of non-residents and forward them to the state where they are licensed known as the home state. Its theme is One Driver, One License, One Record.

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  • The Driver License Compact is an agreement between states in the United States of America. The compact is used to exchange data between motorist’s home state and a state where the motorist incurred a vehicular violation.

What states are not part of the Driver’s license Compact?

The Driver License compact is an interstate compact among 45 states and the District of Columbia. Georgia, Massachusetts, Michigan, Tennessee, and Wisconsin are the only states that are not members. The compact has congressional consent.

Is California part of the Drivers license Compact?

Not all states are part of the Interstate Driver License Compact. Specifically, Georgia, Massachusetts, Tennessee, Michigan and Wisconsin have all opted out of the Compact. California is a member of the Compact and any DUI-related license suspension issued in California is communicated to the other member states.

Is New York part of the Drivers license Compact?

Currently, 45 states and the District of Columbia are members of the compact. New York is one of the member states.

How long does information stay on the NDR?

NDR results for employers will contain only the identification of the state(s) which have reported information on the driver to the NDR and only information reported within the past 3 years from the date of the inquiry.

What states are apart of DLC?

Q: What States are a member of the DLC?

  • Alaska.
  • Alabama.
  • Arizona.
  • Arkansas.
  • California.
  • Colorado.
  • Connecticut.
  • Delaware.

How many interstate compacts are in force today?

More than 200 interstate compacts are now in effect between and among states, each housed independently within a member-state agency.

How do interstate compacts work?

Interstate compacts are agreements between states to enforce a policy that is not necessarily governed by federal law. Interstate compacts are one way that states can work together to enforce a policy or regulation without the interference of the federal government.

Can a state leave an interstate compact?

Not all compacts require congressional consent under the Compact Clause. The Supreme Court has allowed interstate compacts to stand without congressional consent if they are non-political and fall outside the scope of the Compact Clause (Seattle Master Builders Ass’n v.

When should you dim your headlights?

Use your low beams when you come within 500 feet (about one block) of an oncoming vehicle. Also use your low beams when following another vehicle within 300 feet. Slow down when nearing a curve if you are driving the maximum posted speed limit.

Is California a member of the DLC?

Interstate Driver’s License Compact California, along with almost 45 other states, are all parties to the Driver License Compact (DLC). Each jurisdiction reports a driving violation conviction.

Can I get a license in Tennessee if my license is suspended in another state?

Most member states refuse to issue a license to a driver with a suspension pending in another member state. Move to one of the states that is not a member of the DLC. All states are members except Georgia, Massachusetts, Michigan, Tennessee and Wisconsin.

Is Michigan part of the DLC?

Currently, there are 45 states are members of the Interstate Compact. Georgia, Tennessee, Wisconsin, Massachusetts, and Michigan are the only states that currently are not members of the DLC.

How can I remove NDR?

If you have a record in the NDR, you must contact the State of Record or the department of motor vehicles of the state that has listed your license. You will have to pay all the fines and reinstatement fees before the state removes your license listing from the NDR.

Is Nevada part of the DLC?

Georgia, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, Tennessee and Wisconsin do not currently participate.

Driver License Compact – Wikipedia

You are not permitted to operate the following types of vehicles due to the restrictions listed below: In accordance with 49 CFR 391.62(c), the driver is restricted from operating a vehicle (relating to limited exemptions for intra-city zone drivers). Driving a commercial motor vehicle with a manual gearbox is prohibited under Section E of the Code of Civil Procedure. In accordance with 49 CFR 391.62, the letter G denotes qualification (e). k– Restricts the driver’s ability to drive just inside the state Driving a commercial motor vehicle equipped with air brakes is prohibited under Section L of the California Vehicle Code.

In the past, there was a “B” limitation on Driving a class A or B passenger car is prohibited by the letter N.

Truck tractor-trailer combination operation is prohibited for Class A drivers under the provisions of Section O- Passengers are not permitted to be transported in a commercial motor vehicle bus (will appear on commercial learner permit only).

V- Indicates that a medical variation has been granted to the driver.

In this case, using a hearing aid is mandatory for the driver.

Overview

Certain types of vehicles are prohibited from being operated under the following conditions: A- Restricts the driver’s ability to operate under 49 CFR 391.62(c) (relating to limited exemptions for intra-city zone drivers). E– It is unlawful to operate a commercial motor vehicle with a manual gearbox. G- Indicates that the applicant meets the requirements of 49 CFR 391.62. (e). K– Restricts the driver to just driving inside the state. L- Driving a commercial motor vehicle equipped with air brakes is prohibited.

  1. (Previously, this was a “B” limitation) N*– Driving a class A or B passenger vehicle is prohibited.
  2. P– It is unlawful to operate a commercial motor vehicle bus that transports passengers (will appear on commercial learner permit only).
  3. V- Indicates that a medical variance has been granted to the driver in question.
  4. It is necessary for the motorist to use a hearing aid in order to drive.

History

Nevada became the first state to join the Driver License Compact in 1960, marking the beginning of the Compact’s existence. Organizations in the Western States, such as governors’ associations, got together to collaborate on traffic safety initiatives. The Beamer Resolution (also known as the “Interstate Compacts for Highway Safety Resolution”), Public Law 85-684, enacted on August 20, 1958, 72 Stat. 635 (named for Rep. John V. Beamer, R-Indiana), automatically granted permission to states to form compacts in the areas of traffic safety and highway safety infrastructure.

Minor infractions were then added to the list of offenses.

The AAMVA is no longer promoting the Driver License Compact since it has been overtaken by the Driver License Agreement (DLA), which also replaces the Non-Resident Violator Compact.

However, as of 2011, the DLA was comprised of only three states: Arkansas, Connecticut, and Massachusetts, with the remaining states joining afterwards.

States that are not members

Georgia, Wisconsin, and Massachusetts are the only states that are not members. Nevada, according to the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators, revoked the authorizing law in 2007, yet it continues to comply with the agreement in most respects through rules.

Exceptions

  • Some states, such as Colorado, Maryland, Nevada, New York, and Pennsylvania, do not evaluate points for minor infractions and only apply the DLC for significant violations
  • However, other states, such as New York, do not assess points for minor offenses and only apply the DLC for large violations. Likewise, states that are members are free to take action in response to reports of infractions coming from a non-member state
  • Michigan’s legislature passed House Bill 6011 in 2018, allowing the state to become a member of the compact for the first time. As of 2021, the Governor has not yet taken such action. Pennsylvania will only transfer points from another state that is a party to the agreement provided it satisfies specified requirements. New Jersey gives two points for any minor offenses committed outside of the state, regardless of whether the point values would be higher if the violations were committed within the state.

Agreements between US states and Canadian provinces

Following the model of the compact, certain US states share information and take action against driving offenses in select Canadian provinces: a.

  • Smaller violations received in Ontario and Quebec are given points by New York, while Michigan and Ontario exchange information and take adverse action against each other. Maine and Quebec exchange information and take adverse action against each other, while Florida and Quebec share information and take adverse action against each other. British Columbia shares information with the majority of US states and has a reciprocity agreement with all of them. As long as the driver’s home state provides information with BC, they will just need to relinquish their US license and will be awarded a new BC license, with no requirement for testing or further limitations. The driver will be required to provide proof of two years driving history from their home state if their home state does not share information with BC, or they will be issued a license with the province’s new driver restrictions and a magnetic green “N” that must be affixed to the back of any vehicle they operate for the first two years.

National Driver Register

It is a computerized database that contains information about drivers who have had their licenses revoked or suspended, or who have been convicted of significant traffic offences such as driving while intoxicated or under the influence of drugs or alcohol. National Driver Registry (NDR) receives the names of persons who have lost their “license” or who have been convicted of a significant traffic offence from their respective state motor vehicle authorities. A person’s name is checked on the NDR file when they apply for a driver’s license in the state of New York.

Notes

Driver License Compact
Formation date: 1958
Member jurisdictions: 46
Issue(s): Licensure
Compact website


45 states and the District of Columbia have signed on to the Driver License Compact, which is an interstate compact. There are just five states that aren’t members of the organization: Georgia, Massachusetts, Michigan, Tennessee, and Wisconsin. The accord has received the approval of Congress. In order to comply with legal requirements, member states utilize the compact to share information on driver’s licenses and traffic violations with other states for legal purposes. Crimes committed by drivers in other states can be treated as if they were committed in their home states under the terms of the agreement.

Text of the compact

The laws are passed by the legislatures of each member state, with certain adjustments, but the essence of the legislation stays the same across the union.

See also

  • The Council of State Governments – National Center for Interstate Compacts
  • Driver License Compact
  • AAMVA Driver License Compacts
  • The Council of State Governments – National Center for Interstate Compacts

Footnotes

  1. As of January 9, 2020, Massachusetts has enacted laws allowing the state to join the compact, but had not done so as of that date. American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators, “Driver License Compact, Non-Resident Violator Compact, Member Joinder Dates,” accessed January 9, 2020
  2. National Center for Interstate Compacts, “Driver License Compact,” accessed January 20, 2016
  3. American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators, “Driver License Compact, Non-Resident Violator Compact, Member Joinder Dates,” accessed January 9, 2020
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Other What is an interstate compact?Chart of interstate compacts

Driver License Compact FAQ

1.What is the Driver License Compact (DLC) and how does it work? 2.When did the state of Pennsylvania (PA) become a member of the Democratic Leadership Council? 3.Are there any offenses committed in a member state that will result in my driving privileges being suspended in Pennsylvania? 4.Do all of the member nations implement the same suspension conditions? 5.If I am guilty of a DUI in a member state, how long will my driving privileges be suspended? 6.How long would my driving privileges in Pennsylvania be restricted if I am convicted of a major traffic violation other than DUI in a member state other than Pennsylvania?

  1. 8.Do my suspension durations in both states begin and end at the same time?
  2. 9.What impact does the DLC have on an out-of-state motorist who is convicted of a traffic violation in Pennsylvania?
  3. Where can I send a letter or make a phone call to acquire more information about the DLC, my driving record, or the Pennsylvania Point System?
  4. What is the Driver License Compact (DLC) and how does it work?

There are 46 member states to the DLC, which was formed to coordinate law enforcement activities across the country. The following are the most important provisions of the DLC, which member nations are committed to upholding and enforcing:

  • It is necessary to relinquish an out-of-state driver’s license when applying for a new driver’s license under the “one-driver license” idea. “One driver record” idea, which mandates that a driver’s entire driver record be preserved in the driver’s home state so that he or she can be determined to be eligible to drive in his or her home state as well as to be eligible to operate in other jurisdictions as a nonresident operator
  • It is necessary to report all traffic convictions, license suspensions, and license revocations of out-of-state drivers to the home state licensing agency, as well as any other relevant information
  • And, it is necessary to ensure that drivers receive uniform and predictable treatment by treating offenses committed in other states as if they were committed in the home state.
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2. When did Pennsylvania (PA) become a member of the Democratic Leadership Council? Pennsylvania became a member of the DLC on January 1, 1995, and Act 1996-No. 149 was passed into law on December 10, 1996, becoming Act 1996-No. 149. In what circumstances would my driving privileges in Pennsylvania be suspended if I commit a traffic infraction in a member state? It is presumed that the following offenses were committed in a member state and that the appropriate sentence would be imposed in accordance with the provisions of our Vehicle Code if the offense was committed in a member state:

  • Manslaughter or negligent homicide resulting from the operation of a motor vehicle (Section 3732)
  • Driving a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcoholic beverages or a narcotic to a degree that renders the driver incapable of safely operating a motor vehicle (Section 3731
  • Repealed 2/1/2004)
  • Driving a motor vehicle while under the influence of a narcotic to a degree that renders the driver incapable of safely operating a motor vehicle ( A motorist who fails to stop and offer help in the case of a motor vehicle collision that results in the death or serious personal harm of another is guilty of a misdemeanor (Section 3742)
  • Any felony in which a motor vehicle is employed in the conduct of the crime (including Crimes Code and Dangerous Drug Act offenses)

Minor traffic violations such as speeding, running a red light, stopping at a stop sign, and so on, while reported to PennDOT, will (NOT) show on your driving record unless you are a commercial driver’s license (CDL) holder. When you are convicted of a point-related offense in a DLC member state, no points will be applied against your Pennsylvania driving record. 4. Do all of the member nations adopt the same suspension conditions? No. Some states may impose a suspension period that is less than or higher than the period prescribed by PA.

  1. 5.
  2. If your infraction happened before to February 1, 2004, PennDOT will suspend your driving privileges for one year.
  3. If this is your second or subsequent offense, PennDOT will issue a one-year suspension.
  4. If this is your third major traffic crime under Section 1542 of the Vehicle Code, you will be sentenced to a minimum of one year in prison, with a maximum of five years in prison.
  5. When does my suspension in Pennsylvania become effective?
  6. Once we have received notification of the conviction, we will mail you a formal notice of suspension, together with a date on which the suspension will take effect.
  7. It is quite unlikely.
  8. If you are not otherwise prohibited from driving in Pennsylvania, you may continue to do so until you are notified in writing by PennDOT that you are prohibited from driving in Pennsylvania.
  9. What impact does the DLC have on an out-of-state motorist who is convicted of a traffic violation in Pennsylvania?

Additionally, if they are convicted of certain serious traffic offenses such as driving under the influence, vehicular homicide, reckless driving, fleeing or attempting to elude a police officer, racing on a highway, or driving while their operating privilege is suspended or revoked, their privilege to drive in Pennsylvania will be suspended.

10. Which states are members of the Democratic Leadership Council?

​1. Alaska2. Alabama3. Arizona4. Arkansas5. California6. Colorado7. Connecticut8. Delaware9. District of Columbia10. Florida11. Hawaii12. Idaho13. Illinois14. Indiana15. Iowa16. Kansas 17. Kentucky18. Louisiana19. Maine20. Maryland21. Minnesota22. Mississippi23. Missouri24. Montana25. Nebraska26. Nevada27. New Hampshire28. New Jersey29. New Mexico30. New York31. North Carolina ​ ​32. North Dakota33. Ohio34. Oklahoma35. Oregon36. Pennsylvania37. Rhode Island38. South Carolina39. South Dakota40. Texas41. Utah42. Vermont43. Virginia44. Washington45. West Virginia46. Wyoming

11. How can I receive more information regarding the DLC, my driving record, or the PA Point System? Is there a place I can write or call? You can send a letter to the following mailing address: The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation’s Bureau of Driver Licensing is located at P.O. Box 68618 in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17106-8618. Phone: 1-800-932-4600, which is the number for PennDOT’s Customer Call Center. For those who need a TTY, please phone 711 to contact us. Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m.

To return to the frequently asked questions page, click here.

AAMVA – Drivers License Compacts

11. How can I receive more information regarding the DLC, my driving record, or the PA Point System? Is there a mailing address or phone number I can call? You can send a letter to the address shown below: P.O. Box 68618Harrisburg, PA 17106-8618OR Pennsylvania Department of TransportationBureau of Driver Licensing 1-800-932-4600 is the number to call to reach PennDOT’s Customer Call Center. Please dial 711 to reach us if you are using a TTY device. Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., the Call Center is open for business.

  • Compact Member States and Joinder Dates
  • DLC NRVC Compact Survey Results (October 2018)
  • DLC NRVC Compact Member Feedback (October 2018)
  • Compact Member States and Joinder Dates

Any further inquiries regarding the CompactsAgreements or any of the CompactsAgreements should be sent to Jessica Ross, Program Director, Driver License CompactsReciprocity, at [email protected].

  • Jessica Ross held a DLC/NRVC webinar in January 2018, which you may view here.

The Driver License Compact (DLC) is a significant step forward in the quest to increase the effectiveness of law enforcement efforts against drunk drivers and other severe traffic offenders. Serious offenses such as drunk driving, vehicular manslaughter, reckless driving, and other similar offenses are no less serious when committed in a country other than the driver’s native jurisdiction. Convictions, records, licenses, withdrawals, and other data relevant to the licensing procedure were sent between member jurisdictions under the Driver License Compact in order to ensure consistency across member jurisdictions when exchanging information with other members.

  • The Administrative Procedures Manual for the Driver License Compact
  • And

The National Residential Violations Code (NRVC) is intended to standardize the techniques used by different jurisdictions to handle non-resident offenders who have been issued tickets and who have failed to appear or otherwise failed to comply with outstanding moving traffic summonses. In accordance with the compact, member jurisdictions can notify the respective motor vehicle administrations of each other when a resident of one jurisdiction fails to comply with the provisions of a citation issued by another jurisdiction.

Following receipt of notification of a resident’s citation noncompliance by the home jurisdiction motor vehicle administrator, the procedure for license suspension is commenced.

  • NRVC Procedures Manual
  • NRVC History
  • Nonresident Violator Compact (NRVC) Procedures Manual

Driver’s License Compact (DLC) – Ensuring a Consolidated Driver Record

Member countries are obligated to transmit information on an individual’s driving history under the terms of the Driver License Compact (DLC). The key goals of the agreement are as follows:

  • • To encourage conformity with motor vehicle laws and ordinances, as well as administrative rules and regulations applicable to the use of motor vehicles in each of the member countries
  • The purpose of this rule is to guarantee that each driver in a member jurisdiction has only one legal driver’s license at any one time
  • And, to ensure that the state that grants the driver’s license has a comprehensive record of the individual’s previous driving history.

I have an out-of-state driver’s license but I plan to apply for a Maryland driver’s license. Will the points and information about my driving related convictions be transferred to my Maryland driver record?

Following the Driver License Compact, the MVA will seek a copy of your driving record from the other state and will analyze it for any driving-related infractions. When you are convicted of numerous sorts of infractions, the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration will just record the conviction information on your Maryland driving record and will not award points against you. Please refer to the Driver’s License Compact, which has been adopted into Maryland Law, for further information.

I have a Maryland driver’s license and was recently convicted of a vehicle related offense in another state. Will that conviction information and points be placed on my Maryland driver record?

If you are convicted of a crime outside of the state, the state in which you were convicted is required to notify the MVA under the rules of the Driver License Compact. The MVA will update your driving record as soon as it receives the necessary information. When you are convicted of numerous sorts of infractions, the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration will just record the conviction information on your Maryland driving record and will not award points against you. For major violations of the Driver’s License Compact listed in Article IV, the MVA will keep a record of your conviction as well as the points that were assessed as a result of your conviction.

In compliance with Maryland law, the MVA may also take further steps against you, such as suspending or revoking your driver’s license.

Fees:

Administrative Adjudication Division of the Maryland Department of Transportation, 6601 Ritchie Highway, NE, Glen Burnie, MD 21062 For telephone inquiries, call the MVA Customer Service Center at 1-410-768-7000 or 1-301-729-4563 (TTY/Hard of Hearing).

Virginia Compacts – Driver License Compact

Section 46.2-483. The terms of the agreement have been codified into law. All additional jurisdictions lawfully joining the Driver License Compact are required to implement legislation and engage into an agreement with the Compact in the following manner, which is roughly as follows: DRIVER LICENSE TERMS AND CONDITIONS Observations and Declaration of Policy in Article I The party states conclude that:(1) The degree to which state and local ordinances relating to the operation of motor vehicles are followed has a material impact on the safety of their streets and highways.

(2) The degree to which state and local ordinances relating to the operation of motor vehicles are followed has a material impact on the safety of their streets and highways.

(3) The continuation in force of a driver’s license is contingent on the holder’s compliance with the rules and ordinances governing the operation of motor vehicles in the jurisdiction in which the vehicle is driven.

(2) Consider overall compliance with motor vehicle laws, ordinances, administrative rules and regulations as a condition precedent to the continuation or issuance of any license by virtue of which the licensee is authorized or permitted to operate a motor vehicle in any of the party states in order to make the reciprocal recognition of driving licenses and eligibility for them more just and equitable.

  • Article II: Defined Terms According to the terminology used in this compact: (a) “State” means a state, territory, or possession of the United States, the District of Columbia, or the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.
  • (b) “Home state” refers to the state that issued the license or permission to drive a motor vehicle and has the authority to suspend or revoke the use of the license or permit.
  • Article III: Convictions and Reports of Convictions The licensing authority of a party state is required to communicate to the licensing authority of the licensee’s home state any conviction of a person from another party state that occurs within its jurisdiction.
  • Article IVEffect of Conviction on a Person’s Life (2) Driving a motor vehicle while under the influence of drugs or alcohol; or (3) Manslaughter or negligent homicide resulting from the operation of a motor vehicle.
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The laws of a party state shall construe the denominations and descriptions appearing in subdivision (a) of this article as being applicable to and identifying those offenses or violations of a substantially similar nature if those laws do not contain the specific words used in subdivision (a) of this article.

In this article, we will discuss how to submit new license applications.

The applicant will not be issued a license to drive if any of the following conditions are met:(1) The applicant has previously held a license to drive, but the license has been suspended as a result of a violation, in whole or in part, and the suspension period has not expired; or (2) The applicant has previously held a license to drive, but the license has been suspended as a result of a violation, in whole or in part, and the suspension period has not expired.

(4) If the applicant has previously held such a license, but that license has been revoked due to a violation (in whole or in part) and has not yet expired, except that after the expiration of one year from the date on which the license was revoked, such person may submit an application for a new license if that is permitted by law.

(3) The applicant is the bearer of a driver’s license issued by another party state that is currently in effect, unless and until the applicant surrenders such driving license.

Article VII: Information Exchange and the Appointment of a Contract Administrator (a) The administrator of this agreement for each party state shall be the head of the licensing authority of that state’s licensing authority.

In order to ease the administration of this compact, the administrator of each party state shall provide the administrator of each other party state with any information or documents that are reasonably necessary to aid the administration of this compact.

(b) Any party state may withdraw from this compact by enacting a statute repealing the same; however, no such withdrawal shall take effect until six months after the executive head of the withdrawing state has given notice of the withdrawal to the executive heads of all other party states, unless the executive heads of all other party states agree otherwise.

Construction and Severability are covered in Article IX.

Because the provisions of this compact are separable, if any phrase, clause, sentence or provision of this compact is found to be in violation of the constitution of any party state or of the United States, or if the applicability of this compact to any government, agency, person or circumstance is found to be invalid, the validity of the remainder of this compact and the applicability of this compact to any government, agency, person or circumstance shall not be affected thereby.

It is understood that if any provision of this compact is found to be in conflict with the constitution of any state party to it, the compact shall remain in full force and effect with respect to the remaining states and in full force and effect with respect to the state affected with respect to all severable matters.

166, 46.1-167.2; 1989, c.

In order to aid the administration of Articles III, IV, and V of the agreement, the Department shall make any information or documents reasonably necessary to the competent authorities of any other party state available to those authorities.

The compact administrator, as defined in Article VII of the compact, shall not be entitled to any additional compensation as a result of his service as such administrator, but he shall be entitled to reimbursement for expenses incurred in connection with his duties and responsibilities as such administrator, in the same manner as he would be entitled to reimbursement for expenses incurred in connection with any other duties or responsibilities of his office or employment, as provided in the compact.

The provisions of sections 46.1-167.10 of the 1968 Code of Civil Procedure were repealed by the 1989 Code of Civil Procedure.

The governor will serve as “executive head” within the meaning of the agreement.

The provisions of sections 46.1-167.11 of the 1968 Code of Civil Procedure are also included in the 1989 Code of Civil Procedure.

Constitutional provisions assumed to apply to transgressions listed in section (a) of Article IV of the compact Article IV of the compact provides that the following sections of the Code of Virginia and county, city, and town ordinances substantially paralleling such sections shall be deemed to cover the offenses of subdivision (a) of Article IV for the purpose of complying with subdivisions (a) and (c) of the compact: Sections 18.2-266 and 46.2-341.24A apply to subdivision (2); Sections 46.2-894 through 46.2-899 apply to subdivision (4); and Sections 46.2-894 through 46.2-899 apply to subdivision (2).

In the case of subdivisions (1) and (3), the Department shall decide which offenses are covered in the same manner as under 46.2-389, subject to the limitation that the accident resulted in the death or physical harm of another person.

166, sections 46.1-167.12; 1989 Act No.

255.

Question should be included in the application for a driver’s license; surrender of a driver’s license granted by another state or jurisdiction To ensure that Article V of this compact is enforced, the Department shall include a question on the application form for a driver’s license under 46.2-323 asking whether the applicant is currently licensed in another state and, if the applicant is so licensed, require the surrender of such license prior to granting the application in accordance with the requirements of this chapter.

Article 46.1-167.13 of the 1968 Constitution; Sections 780 and 727 of 1984 Constitution; 1989 Constitution.

Interstate Driver License Compact Update

Please note that this article initially appeared in the Fall 2020 issue of the National Motorists Association’s Quarterly Magazine Driving Freedoms, which is available online. Please join the NMA now if you would want to help the organization. Tennessee became the 47th state and the District of Columbia to join the Interstate Driver License Compact this summer, joining 46 other states and the District of Columbia. States utilize the Compact to transmit information on a driver’s driving history, such as license suspensions and traffic offences, with one another.

  • Nevada, in fact, overturned the statute permitting its membership in the DLC in 2007, thereby ending the state’s participation.
  • Furthermore, Nevada holds the distinction of being the Compact’s first member state.
  • So, how does this effect you?
  • Simply said, if you obtain an out-of-state traffic citation and do not pay it, you may face legal consequences if both states are members of the Compact system.
  • In reality, accepting a plea bargain with the charging state in exchange for lower penalties does not ensure that the motorist would not be subjected to further and more severe penalties in his or her home state.
  • Most charges not reported to the state, including as non-moving offenses, parking fines, and even automated camera penalties, are not included in the information sharing provided by the Compact.
  • According to Senate Transportation Committee Bill S486 would ban the Motor Vehicle Commissioner and other state authorities from providing any NJ driver’s personal information to jurisdictions that are interested in imposing automated ticket fees.
  • Since 2014, South Dakota has had a statute in place that is comparable to this one.
  • “We’re naming this law the Automated Enforcement Inoculation Act because it would protect citizens from the unscrupulous automated enforcement camera, red-light camera, and speed camera business, which has been plagued with corruption everywhere it has been implemented,” he continued.
  • Despite the fact that the bipartisan 2020 version was unanimously approved by the Transportation Committee, it has not yet been considered by the entire Senate.
  • O’Scanlon, who are working to limit the scope of the Driver License Compact, are crucial.

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DMV Driver’s License Compact

Obtaining and maintaining a driver’s license is governed by the rules and regulations of the individual state in which the individual resides. Many people believe that if they receive a traffic ticket or are arrested for a driving offense in one state, it will not have an impact on their driving record in another state. Driver license compacts and interstate motor vehicle information sharing, on the other hand, make it possible to lose your driving privileges in one state without losing your ability to drive in all of the other states.

  1. It was a group of state governors that came up with the idea of sharing driving safety information in an effort to crack down on reckless driving that the DLC was born.
  2. In addition to the District of Columbia, all states, with the exception of Georgia, Wisconsin, Massachusetts, Michigan, and Tennessee, are members of the Democratic Leadership Council.
  3. In the United States, the National Driver Register (NDR) is a database that contains information on drivers who have been convicted of major driving crimes, such as DUI or vehicular manslaughter, as well as those who have had their license suspended or revoked.
  4. In each jurisdiction, a conviction for a driving infraction is reported.
  5. The data that is shared is typically retained for a duration of 10 years.

Who Shall Not Be Licensed

Obtaining and maintaining a driver’s license is governed by different rules and regulations in each state. Getting a traffic ticket or being arrested for a driving offense in one state may leave you with the notion that it will have no effect on your driving record in another state. However, as a result of driver licensing compacts and interstate motor vehicle information sharing, losing your license in one state may result in you losing your ability to drive in all of the states involved. This compact, which includes California and almost 45 other states, is a voluntary agreement between the states (DLC).

When a driver commits a traffic infraction such as reckless driving, driving under the influence (DUI), or even a minor traffic offense, the violation is reported to the DLC, which ensures that all member states are informed of the violation, regardless of where it happened.

As a condition of receiving federal assistance, all states must, nevertheless, use the National Driver Register.

Every time a driver applies for a state driver’s license, the state will check the NDR to see if the motorist is a problem driver, and if the driver is deemed to be a problem driver, the state may refuse the driver’s license application altogether.

Personal identifying information, such as a person’s name, residence, sexual orientation, date of birth, driver’s license number, reporting state, and, in most cases, a social security number, is sent to the NDR. Ordinarily, the information that is shared may be traced back for 10 years.

  • Leaving the site of an accident or failing to stop and offer help at a personal injury accident or fatal accident
  • Or committing a felony in which a motor vehicle was employed

Protecting Your Driving Privileges

With or without a driver’s license, getting about might be difficult. California is unquestionably a car society, and most people rely on their automobiles to go to and from work, school, food shopping, and dropping off children at school. It is probable that in other states, vehicles will be required in places where public transit is unavailable, particularly in rural areas. One error should not disqualify you from obtaining a driver’s license, especially if the mistake occurred in a different state from where the mistake occurred.

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In both the DMV hearing and criminal case, he or she can represent you, even if you are located out of state.

Interstate Driving License Compact

The Interstate Driver License Compact is an agreement between states, including Florida, that specifies how information about various sorts of traffic offenses is transmitted across the participating states. Drivers who violate the Interstate Driver License Compact are subject to a range of penalties, ranging from criminal traffic crimes such as driving while intoxicated (DUI) and reckless driving to civil infractions such as speeding and other moving offences. Under the Interstate License Compact, records of traffic violations and suspensions are conveyed to the nonresident’s home state once they have been received in the host state.

A number of states, including Massachusetts, Wisconsin, Georgia, Michigan, and Tennessee, are not part of the Interstate Driver License Compact, which was established in 1996.

National Driver Register as a Comprehensive Database

States also provide information to the National Driver Register, which is a comprehensive database of driving offense records pertaining to drivers who have had their driver licenses revoked or suspended as a result of serious traffic violations such as DUI, reckless driving, or vehicular manslaughter, among other things. In Florida, information included in the National Driver Register can be utilized to refuse a driver’s license application to someone who has applied for one elsewhere in the country.

The collateral effects of your actions should be discussed with you by your attorney in Florida prior to the case being settled, so that you can make an educated decision about how to address your situation.

Driver’s License Compact

States also provide information to the National Driver Register, which is a comprehensive database of driving offense records pertaining to drivers who have had their driver licenses revoked or suspended as a result of serious traffic violations such as DUI, reckless driving, or vehicular manslaughter, among others. In Florida, information included in the National Driver Register can be utilized to refuse a driver’s license application to someone who meets the requirements. You should consult a counsel in your home state if you are arrested or cited in Florida for a civil or criminal traffic violation while holding an out-of-state driver’s license to determine the potential consequences of a conviction on your driving record if you are found guilty.

Before the case is decided, your attorney in Florida should also discuss the collateral ramifications with you so that you may make an educated decision about how to proceed with the case’s resolution.

DLC 1- NRVC 2Compact Member Joined Dates
DLC 1 Effective Date NRVC 2 Effective Date
Alabama 1966 Alabama October 1981
Alaska September 1986 Alaska Not a Member
Arizona 1963 Arizona January 1993
Arkansas 1969 Arkansas January 1986
California 1963 California Not a Member
Colorado 1965 Colorado January 1982
Connecticut January 1993 Connecticut January 1981
Delaware 1964 Delaware February 1979
District of Columbia November 1985 District of Columbia August 1980
Florida 1967 Florida October 1981
Georgia Not a Member Georgia February 1980
Hawaii 1971 Hawaii January 1996
Idaho 1963 Idaho October 1992
Illinois 1963 Illinois July 1984
Indiana 1967 Indiana January 1980
Iowa 1965 Iowa November 1980
Kansas 1965 Kansas January 1983
Kentucky August 1996 Kentucky December 1978
Louisiana 1968 Louisiana November 1979
Maine 1963 Maine January 1982
Maryland 1978 Maryland July 1979
Massachusetts Not a Member Massachusetts December 1987
Michigan Not a Member Michigan Not a Member
Minnesota 1990 Minnesota October 1978
Mississippi 1962 Mississippi March 1979
Missouri October 1985 Missouri October 1980
Montana 1963 Montana Not a Member
Nebraska 1963 Nebraska January 1982
Nevada 1961 Nevada February 1990
New Hampshire October 1986 New Hampshire January 1982
New Jersey 1966 New Jersey July 1983
New Mexico 1963 New Mexico January 1985
New York 1965 New York June 1982
North Carolina September 1993 North Carolina September 1980
North Dakota May 1986 North Dakota July 1980
Ohio October 1987 Ohio January 1985
Oklahoma 1967 Oklahoma July 1987
Oregon 1963 Oregon Not a Member
Pennsylvania October 1994 Pennsylvania July 1979
Rhode Island January 1987 Rhode Island April 1986
South Carolina August 1987 South Carolina January 1981
South Dakota November 1987 South Dakota May 1980
Tennessee ’65/’97 dropped out Tennessee September 1984
Texas September 1993 Texas January 1982
Utah 1965 Utah July 1985
Vermont October 1987 Vermont October 1985
Virginia 1963 Virginia July 1980
Washington 1963 Washington October 1993
West Virginia July 1972 West Virginia July 1978
Wisconsin Not a Member Wisconsin Not a Member
Wyoming May 1987 Wyoming July 1987
Note:The Law Office of Robert Tayac assumes no liability for any use of”BayAreaDUIDefense.com”as it is provided for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for the case and client specific advice of an attorney.

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Robert Tayac’s office may be reached at 415-552-6000, or 800-254-0000 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 8:00 a.m. any day of the week and in an emergency at any time.

Driving License Compact Driver’s License Hearing

The Driver’s License Compact

Drivers who have a license issued in one state but receive a traffic ticket in another sometimes believe that the ticket will have no effect on their driving privileges. They are completely incorrect. This is due to a piece of legislation known as the Driver’s License Compact (DLC). The DLC is an interstate agreement among states that allows them to share information on their drivers with one another. Details on traffic ticket convictions and any administrative proceedings (such as suspensions) taken against a motorist from another state are among the information that is transmitted.

States that are members of the DLC have agreed that convicted out-of-state drivers will provide information about their conviction and the offense to the licensing state, which will thereafter record the offense and all pertinent facts on the driver’s driving record.

Traffic Ticket Convictions

Member states undertake to submit an out-of-state driver’s conviction to the licensing authority of the person’s home state within 15 days after the conviction. It is the individual who has committed the violation, as well as the court or jurisdiction in which the infraction occurred, that is identified in the information provided to the home state. It also includes the dates of the driver’s arrest (if any) and conviction, as well as the plea the driver entered. Aside from that, the information will include whether or not the conviction was the result of an admission of guilt, a court decision, or the forfeiture of bail, bond, or other security.

Whether the infraction was committed in a commercial motor vehicle or a motor vehicle transporting hazardous chemicals will also be included in the report.

Suspensions or Revocations

States that participate in the program will also notify drivers of any administrative proceedings taken against them in their state, such as suspensions or revocations of driving privileges. This notification will be accompanied by any supporting paperwork that may be required. In many situations, a suspension of driving privileges will have an impact on the driver’s ability to drive in his or her home state. Some states are totally reciprocal, whilst others will only respond in reaction to specified convictions, and some are something in between.

Therefore, certain states may impose more or fewer repercussions than would be evaluated in the state of conviction, depending on the circumstances of the case.

Unpaid Tickets

When a motorist fails to pay a traffic ticket issued in another state, the state in which the ticket was issued will pursue the same action as it would if the driver had been licensed in that state. In several states, such as New York and New Jersey, it can result in the suspension of one’s driving privileges in the state until the situation is handled. According to the DLC agreement, member states are required to disclose both the delinquency of the ticket and any decision to restrict driving privileges to the other members.

Points

A state’s power to assess them against an out-of-state license is not granted by the DLC. States that employ point systems, on the other hand, will keep track of the point value of any and every traffic convictions for out-of-state drivers. The ramifications of those points can and will have an impact on that motorist. For example, a Connecticut motorist who is convicted of 11 traffic violations and receives 11 points on his or her driving record may have his or her driving privileges stopped in New York.

Others, such as the city of New York, will not do so.

Fines

Regardless of whether or not a state is a member of the DLC, the state in which the violation occurs determines the amount of the fine for the infraction. In other words, if a driver from Ohio is caught for speeding in New York, he or she will be charged the New York rate for the violation, not the amount that would have been charged if the offense had occurred in Ohio.

Auto Insurance Rates

The DLC mandates that member states publish out-of-state traffic convictions on their drivers’ records, and the DLC enforces this requirement. That implies that vehicle insurance companies will ultimately become aware of the conviction, even if it occurred in a different state. This is likewise true for any suspensions or unpaid tickets that may have occurred. This will have an influence on a number of criteria, including the sort of crime, the person’s driving history, his or her age, and their or her family’s degree of income, among other things.

States That Participate in the DLC

The DLC is a collaborative effort including nearly all 50 states and the District of Columbia. This includes the following:

  • Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota
  • Ohio
  • Oklahoma
  • Oregon
  • Pennsylvania
  • Rhode Island
  • South Carolina
  • South Dakota
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Virginia
  • Washington
  • West Virginia
  • Wyoming

Georgia, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, Tennessee, and Wisconsin are the only states that do not participate at this time. In contrast, nearly all non-participating states have policies or laws in place that outline processes and procedures for dealing with either out-of-state drivers who are convicted in their state, residents who are convicted of traffic violations while traveling outside of their state, or both of these situations.

That is to say, just because a state does not participate in the DLC does not automatically exempt drivers from the repercussions of receiving an out-of-state traffic ticket from having to pay it.

What to do About Out-of-State Tickets?

Drivers who get a traffic citation in another state should consult with an attorney who is licensed to practice in the state where the offense took place. In order to minimize or eliminate the penalties of an out-of-state traffic ticket, it is necessary to retain the services of a traffic ticket attorney. It may be possible for an experienced attorney to defend the motorist without the need for the driver to return to the state in issue depending on the state in which he or she practices. If you or someone you care about has been charged for a traffic violation in New York or New Jersey but is licensed in a different state, contact the Rosenblum Law Firm immediately for advice and representation.

For a free consultation on your case, send an email or call 888-883-5529.

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