How To Report Repayment Of Social Security Benefits On Tax Return?

Repayment of benefits. Your gross benefits are shown in box 3 of Form SSA-1099 or Form RRB-1099. Your repayments are shown in box 4. The amount in box 5 shows your net benefits for 2019 (box 3 minus box 4). Use the amount in box 5 to figure whether any of your benefits are taxable.

How is income repayment reported on my tax return?

The way repayment is claimed depends in which year income was repaid and how much the repayment was. If you repay income in the same year (such as Social Security benefits) you can net the repayment amount against the amount reportable as income.

Can I claim a repayment of Social Security benefits?

Yes – you can claim a repayment of social security benefits. The way repayment is claimed depends in which year income was repaid and how much the repayment was. If you repay income in the same year (such as Social Security benefits) you can net the repayment amount against the amount reportable as income.

Where is the Social Security repayment deduction on a tax form?

Taking the Deduction For tax year 2017, you take the Social Security repayment deduction on Line 23 of Schedule A, which lists itemized deductions that can be subtracted from your adjusted gross income. This rather obscure deduction is not broken down on the form; it simply comes under ‘Certain Miscellaneous Deductions.’

Where do I report Social Security benefits on 1099 form?

Forms and Reporting If you’re receiving Social Security benefits, the amounts you took in and/or repaid appear on Form 1099-SSA, which arrives in the mail in January for the previous year. The payments appear in Box 3, the repayments in Box 4 and the net amount in Box 5.

I had to pay back social security can i claim the payment on taxes

Yes, you are eligible to receive a refund of your social security benefits.The method by which repayment is claimed is dependent on the year in which the income was repaid and the amount of the repayment.If you refund money in the same year (for example, Social Security payments), you can deduct the amount of the repayment from the amount of income that must be reported.In the year in which the income is refunded, a taxpayer who repays an amount that was recorded as income in a previous year may be eligible to claim a tax deduction or tax credit for the amount repaid.If the amount of the payback is less than $3,000, the repayment will be waived.On Schedule A, claim a miscellaneous itemized deduction for miscellaneous expenses (subject to the 2 percent -of-AGI limitation).

It is not possible to claim a tax advantage if the person does not itemize.″ The data input is contained in the Deductions/Credits area of the accounting software.Repayment in excess of $3,000.If the amount you repaid exceeded $3,000, you can deduct the repayment from your income (as explained under Type of deduction, earlier).You can, however, choose whether to deduct it as a deduction or as a credit.You are free to select the technique that best suits your needs.

Are Social Secuity Repayments Tax Deductible?

The following is a guest post by Tom Streissguth, who was reviewed by Alicia Bodine, a Certified Ramsey Solutions Master Financial Coach, on March 06, 2019.Contrary to popular belief, Social Security, being a large government bureaucracy, may make mistakes and, in certain situations, will argue that benefits have been improperly withheld.In the event that you are voluntarily returning money to Social Security, you will be required to do a little amount of additional tax accounting.You may be eligible for a Social Security disability overpayment payment plan, which is advantageous.The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) requires you to make an adjustment to any benefits you received in order to determine the rate of income tax you may owe on such benefits.

Tip

If you paid more in Social Security benefits than you got, you may be able to deduct the difference from your taxes. However, they are only deductible to the extent that they are offset by a net positive benefit you obtained in a preceding calendar year.

Forms and Reporting

If you are receiving Social Security benefits, the amounts you received and/or remitted are reported on Form 1099-SSA, which is mailed to you in January of each year for the previous year’s earnings and contributions.The payments are listed in Box 3, the repayments are listed in Box 4, and the net amount is listed in Box 5.This last number is used to calculate your income tax liability; your benefits may be taxable based on your filing status and the amount of additional income you’ve received in addition to your unemployment benefits.However, if the amount entered in Box 5 is less than $3,000, the IRS cautions that it is no longer considered a miscellaneous itemized deduction and hence cannot be deducted.Miscellaneous deductions are no longer allowed as a result of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, which took effect for the 2018 tax year and is now in force.

Going Negative

If you have been reimbursing Social Security disability payments and have paid more than you have received, you have a negative net benefit from the Social Security Administration.This implies that you will not be subject to income tax on the advantages you got.If you’re filing a joint return and both you and your spouse received the 1099, you’ll need to add the net amounts from the two Box 5’s together to get the total amount.If the outcome is negative, you will not be taxed on any of your Social Security income, which is good news again.

Offsetting the Net

If your net benefit in Box 5 is negative, you may be able to claim an itemized deduction, but only to offset a net positive benefit from a prior year’s earnings.Example: if you received $2,000 in Social Security payments in 2017, you would be eligible to deduct $2,000 from your 2018 tax liability as a negative net benefit (or following years).It is advisable to get the advice of a skilled tax expert who can assist you in deducting the appropriate amounts for your net positive advantages.

Taking the Deduction

If you have a Social Security repayment deduction, you may claim it on Line 23 of Schedule A, which includes all of the itemized deductions that can be taken from your adjusted gross income for the 2017 tax year.The form does not include a breakdown of this fairly odd deduction; it is just listed under the heading ″Certain Miscellaneous Deductions.″ You must list each miscellaneous deduction, including the kind and amount, on an attached form if one is provided.If you want to deduct your miscellaneous deductions, they must total more than 2 percent of your adjusted gross income when added together.

How To Report Repayment Of Social Security Benefits On Tax Return? (Correct answer)

Claim of Right / Section 1341 Repayment/ Social Security Repayment (desktop version)

  1. Either lower their income in the current year, deduct the amount repaid as a miscellaneous deduction on Schedule A, Form 1040 in the year in which it is repaid, or claim a refundable credit against their taxes in the year in which payback happens

Reduce their income in the current year, deduct the amount repaid as a miscellaneous deduction on Schedule A, Form 1040 in the year in which it is repaid, or claim a refundable credit against their tax liability on Form 1040 in the year in which the repayment happens

Can you deduct Social Security benefits repaid?

It is possible that you will be able to deduct the amount of Social Security Benefits that you had to refund from your income in a previous year if you repay an amount of benefits that you had included in your income in an earlier year in the year in which you reimbursed them.

Is back pay from Social Security taxable?

Social Security Disability Back pay is taxable as part of the income earned in the current year. Some receivers, however, may encounter difficulties when it comes time to file their taxes as a result of this back pay.

Can you pay back your Social Security benefits?

Make a Restitution In the event that you change your mind within 12 months of enrolling in Social Security, you will be able to reimburse all of the money you and your family have received, plus interest, and you will be able to withdraw your Social Security application.

What do you do when Social Security says you owe them money?

If you believe the overpayment was made in error and you are unable to pay it back, you can petition the Social Security Administration to pardon the overpayment. A ″Request for Waiver″ is the formal name for this. You must submit a particular form known as the SSA-632. You should file your Request as soon as possible in order to prevent money from being deducted from your monthly payments.

How do I pay back an overpayment from Social Security?

Pay online at pay.gov/public/form /start/834689469, where you may pay with a credit card, debit card, or bank account, among other payment options. Send us a check in the amount of the overpayment if you haven’t received it within 30 days. Contact us to set up a payment plan that will allow you to pay back the money in monthly payments.

What is claim of right repayment over $3000?

In the event that you’re compelled to pay back income in excess of $3,000 from a prior tax year that you believed you were entitled to retain, you may be eligible to claim a Claim of Right Repayment deduction in the current year. You reported and paid taxes on the money, completely unaware that you would be required to repay it.

How do I report back pay?

Form W-2, Wage and Tax Statement, or electronic wage reports should be used by employers to record back pay as wages during the fiscal year in which the employee is actually paid.

Do you get taxed on back pay?

The W-2, Wage and Tax Statement, or electronic wage reports should be used by employers to record back pay as wages during the fiscal year in which the employee is actually paid.

Do you have to pay taxes on back pay?

The Supreme Court of the United States has determined that awards of back pay to employees are subject to federal taxation in the year in which the earnings are actually paid, rather than the year in which the wages should have been paid or were really earned, as previously thought.

How long do you have to pay back Social Security overpayment?

The Social Security Administration (SSA) has the authority to withhold all of your Social Security payments in order to recover the overpayment.However, unless there is evidence of fraud, they will almost always allow you to pay it back in smaller quantities over time.You will be required to pay a minimum of $10.00 each month in repayment.The Social Security Administration attempts to recover the funds within three years.

Is there really a $16728 Social Security bonus?

Most seniors are fully unaware of the $16,728 Social Security bonus they are entitled to. However, a few little-known ″Social Security secrets″ may be able to assist you in ensuring a raise in your retirement income. For example, one simple method might result in an increase in your annual income of up to $16,728 dollars!

Who is responsible for Social Security overpayment?

As long as the recipient has gotten any advantage from the funds, he or she is accountable; as long as the representative payee has been negligent in causing the overpayment, the representative payee is personally liable. Not used the funds for the beneficiary’s use and benefit, as was intended.

What is the statute of limitations for Social Security overpayments?

If an overpayment determination is made, is there a statute of limitations that applies to the case? Yes. The Social Security Administration’s regulations provide a temporal restriction on how long a previous determination can be reviewed or changed. That timeframe is two years in the case of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.

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What happens if you don’t report income to Social Security?

WAIT, WHAT HAPPENS IF YOU DO NOT REPORT CHANGES IN A TIMELY AND ACCURATE MANNER? If you do not report changes on time, you may be underpaid and may not collect the benefits that are owed to you as promptly as you would otherwise be able to. We may overcharge you, and you may be required to reimburse us.

Repayment of Social Security IRC Credit

WAIT, WHAT HAPPENS IF YOU DO NOT REPORT CHANGES IN A TIMELY AND ACCURATE MATERIAL? If you do not report changes in a timely manner, you may be underpaid and may not collect the benefits that are owed to you as promptly as you would otherwise be able. Occasionally, we will overcharge a customer, and the customer will be required to reimburse us.

  1. Calculate your tax for 2020 based on the itemized deduction claimed on Schedule A (Form 1040), line 16 of the tax return.
  2. The following procedures will assist you in calculating your tax for 2020. a. Calculate the tax due without taking into account the itemized deduction on Schedule A (Form 1040), line 16. To the extent that any component of the negative figure indicates a repayment of benefits after 1983, refigure your annual taxable benefits in the same way as you would if your total benefits for the year were reduced by that portion of the negative figure. Then, recalculate the tax for that particular year. To compute your real tax amounts, subtract the total of your refigured tax amounts from the total of your actual tax amounts in (b). Calculate the value in (c) by subtracting the result in (a).

Examine the difference between the tax figures calculated using procedures 1 and 2.The lower of the two sums is the amount of tax you will pay in 2020.Use line 16 of Schedule A (Form 1040) to claim the itemized deduction if method 1 results in a lower tax liability.If method 2 results in a lower tax bill, claim a credit for the difference on Schedule 3 (Form 1040), line 12d, for the amount saved by using method 2.On the entry line, type ″I.R.C.1341″ in the space provided.

Schedule A (Form 1040), line 16 should be used to deduct the payback if both approaches result in the same tax.To input the credit into the TaxAct software, follow these steps:

  1. From within your TaxAct return (either online or on a desktop computer), select the Federal tab. On smaller devices, select Federal from the drop-down menu in the top left-hand corner.
  2. To expand the Miscellaneous Topics menu item in the Federal Quick Q&A Topics menu, choose Credit for repayment (I.R.C. 1341)
  3. then click OK.
  4. Continue with the interview process to ensure that all of the necessary information is collected
  5. On the screen headed Credit for Repayment, enter the amount of I.R.C. 1341 credit you calculated before, and then press the Continue button. When the return is printed, the text ″IRC 1341″ will display at the bottom of the page.

Please keep in mind that any link in the information above is automatically updated once a year and will lead you to the most recent version of the document available at the time it is visited.

Repayment of Social Security Benefits on SSA-1099

When Benefit Repayments Exceed Gross Benefits: Your Form SSA-1099 or Form RRB-1099 will reflect that the total benefits you repaid (box 4) exceed the gross benefits (box 3) you received in some circumstances.It is possible that this may occur, and your net benefits in box 5 will be a negative amount (a figure in parenthesis), with none of your benefits being taxed.Worksheet 1 should not be used in this situation.You can use a negative figure in box 5 of one form to balance a positive figure in box 5 of another form for the same year if you get more than one form.Any inquiries concerning this negative figure should be sent to your local SSA office or regional RRB field office for more clarification.Return as a group: For example, if you and your spouse file a joint return and your Form SSA-1099 or RRB-1099 has a negative figure in box 5 but your spouse’s form does not, deduct the amount in box 5 of your form from the amount in box 5 of your spouse’s form.

You must do this in order to calculate your net benefits when determining whether or not your combined benefits are taxed.As an illustration, John and Mary submit a joint tax return for 2015.John got Form SSA-1099, which showed $3,000 in Box 5 of the total.Mary also received a Form SSA-1099, with the sum in box 5 equal to ($500) in addition.When determining whether any of their combined benefits are taxable, John and Mary will use the sum of $2,500 ($3,000 minus $500) as the amount of their net benefits.

Reimbursement of benefits obtained in a previous calendar year: if the total amount shown in box 5 of all of your Forms SSA-1099 and RRB-1099 is a negative figure, you may be able to claim an itemized deduction for the portion of this negative figure that represents benefits that you included in gross income in a previous year, as long as the total amount shown in box 5 of all of your Forms SSA-1099 and RRB-1099 is a positive figure.Deductions for amounts less than $3,000: Unless the amount of this deduction is $3,000 or less, it is subject to the 2 percent-of-adjusted gross income cap on certain miscellaneous itemized deductions.Claim it on line 23 of Schedule A (Form 1040) as a deduction.More than $3,000 in tax deductions: If the amount of this deduction exceeds $3,000, you should calculate your taxes in two ways:

  1. Make a calculation of your tax for 2015 using the itemized deduction listed on Schedule A, line 28
  2. Calculate your tax for 2015 by following the procedures outlined below:
  1. Calculate the tax without taking into account the itemized deduction listed on Schedule A, line 28.
  2. Each year after 1983 in which a portion of the negative figure reflects a repayment of benefits, recalculate your taxable benefits as if your total benefits for the year were decreased by the portion of the negative figure representing a repayment of benefits in that particular year. Then you have to recalculate the tax for that year.
  3. To compute your real tax amounts, subtract the total of your refigured tax amounts from the total of your actual tax amounts in (b).
  4. Take the result in (c) and subtract it from the result in (a)

Examine the difference between the tax estimated in techniques (1) and (2).(2).The lower of the two figures is your tax for 2015.Use line 28 of Schedule A (Form 1040) to claim the itemized deduction if method (1) results in a lower tax liability.To claim a tax credit for the amount from step 2(c) above on Form 1040, line 71, write ″I.R.C.1341″ in the margin to the left of line 71, and sign your name in the bottom right corner of the form.

If the tax resulting from both procedures is the same, subtract the payback from the tax on Schedule A (Form 1040), line 28.

Social Security Tax Repayment: What To Do With A Corrected W-2KateHorrell

Disclaimer: This post may include affiliate links, which means that I may receive a commission if you click on them.As an Amazon Associate, I receive commissions on qualifying purchases.Click here to learn more.All of my thoughts are my own, and I only recommend goods that I personally use and enjoy!In the latter half of 2020, the vast majority of military service members are completing up the Social Security tax payback that was deferred over the previous year.This will result in a change in your payment, and you may receive a revised W-2 for the year 2020.

What Were The Deferral and Repayment?

The Social Security taxes withheld from military pay for those earning less than $104,000 per year were not withheld from military pay from September 2020 through December 2020.Taxes on such items were collected during the year 2021.In the Leave and Earnings Statement, the amount of taxes that were not withheld was shown as a debt due to the government.The amount of the debt then dropped by a certain amount each month when the ″payment″ was made.Each month, the amount collected for repayment amounted to around 2.5 percent of the employee’s base income.Adjustments in compensation from 2020 to 2021, promotions, time-in-service raises, and other pay changes all affect the actual amount received by each worker.

No More Social Security Tax Repayment

The vast majority of military personnel were on track to return the delayed Social Security taxes by December 2021, according to their plan.This implies that they will not be required to make that ″debt″ payment in the future.This will be reflected in the paycheck issued on January 14, 2022.This implies that, in addition to the 2.7 percent pay rise allowed by the 2022 National Defense Authorization Act and any increase in BAH for 2022, they will get about 2.5 percent more in their monthly pay.

Corrected W-2 Tax Forms

When the delayed taxes are paid in full, DFAS will issue a 2020 W-2C that reflects the amounts that were actually paid instead of the amounts that were deferred.Consequently, there would be an adjustment to the amount reported in Box 4 of the W-2.The vast majority of folks will not be required to do anything with this revised W-2.Those who have more than one source of income that is protected by Social Security and who have earned income in excess of $137,700 will be the only ones who will need to take any action, such as filing an updated federal tax return.It is calculated per taxpayer, not per couple.Depending on whether block of the W-2 has changed, you may be obligated to file an updated tax return for the year 2020.

If you’re still not sure, consult with a tax specialist for guidance.On your installation, you can take use of the Military One Source tax scheme as well as the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program.

Who Isn’t Finished Repaying Their Social Security Taxes?

Because of variances in compensation owing to training schedules, it is possible that reserve members will not have repaid their whole deferred sum by the end of 2021.Active duty military personnel who were on inactive pay status for a period of time may not have repaid the whole amount of the delayed payment.These military members will continue to make payments toward the repayment of deferred taxes until the whole amount owed has been satisfied.It will be at that point that a revised W-2 will be issued.Even if you receive an altered 2020 W-2, there is no need to take any action for the vast majority of people.In addition to your usual pay raise, you’ll see a rise in your take-home pay in 2022 as a result of the tax-home pay increase.

Thank you for putting this crap in the past!

Repayment of Social Security Income when Repayment Occurs in a Subsequent Year

A difference in income owing to training schedules may have resulted in reservists not being able to repay their whole delayed sum by 2020.Active duty military personnel who were on inactive pay status for a period of time may not have been able to repay the complete amount of delayed pay.Once the deferred taxes have been settled in full, these service members will no longer be responsible for them.A revised W-2 form will be provided at that time as a result of this.Even if you receive a revised 2020 W-2, there is usually no need to take any action.In addition to your usual salary raise, you’ll notice an increase in your take-home pay in 2022 as well.

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Thank you for putting this insanity to rest!

The credit: If you opt to utilize the credit instead of the income decrease, you will have to compute the credit yourself. If the credit is used, the tax return would have to be completed in the TurboTax Desktop edition. This may be accomplished by following the instructions at: How to move from online TurboTax to TurboTax software? and TurboTax Prior Year Products, to name a few.

  1. Calculate your tax for 2020 without taking the returned amount into consideration.
  2. Recalculate your tax from the previous year (the year in which you first reported the income), but do not include in your income the amount you reimbursed in the following year
  3. Subtract the amount of tax in (2) from the amount of tax stated on your return for the previous year. This is where the credit is due
  4. Using step 1, subtract the answer in (3) from the tax for 2020 that was computed without the deduction.

You may utilize either the TurboTax Online or the TurboTax Desktop if you prefer to employ the income reduction approach, which is the most typical option. ​​​​​​​

Follow the steps outlined below to complete the technique you’ve chosen. Using the Income Reduction feature in TurboTax is recommended.

  1. Obtain access to your TurboTax account or begin working on your tax return
  2. Select Federal Taxes from the drop-down menu, followed by Deductions and Credits.
  3. To find it, navigate to the section Other Deductions and Credits (you may need to first click on reveal all tax breaks if you are working online, or I’ll pick what I’m working on if you are using the installed desktop version).
  4. Other Deductible Expenses can be started (or revised) by clicking the Start (or Revisit) button.
  5. On the next screens, you will be presented with a series of questions. You’re searching for the one that says ″Claim of right repayment exceeding $3,000″ or anything like that. In the event that you encounter this page, choose yes. (Be careful to disregard the question about repayments of $3,000 or less, which is comparable.)
  6. In the box titled ″Claim of right repayment exceeding $3,000,″ enter the amount of the payback to be made, and then click Continue.

Taking Advantage of TurboTax’s Credit Take advantage of the credit in TurboTax by filling out two separate forms.It is necessary to determine the amount of overpaid tax in the year that income was really received in order to complete the first phase of this process.For this, you must use the TurboTax Desktop program (or another way) to figure out what your tax burden would have been if you hadn’t received any earnings.

  1. The credit may only be applied if you have the TurboTax Desktop version installed on your computer and are in the Forms mode
  2. otherwise, the credit will not be issued.
  3. By selecting the Forms icon in the program’s toolbar, you may switch to the Forms mode.
  4. In the list of forms on the left, choose 1040/1040RSR Wks, which is located above the actual Form 1040.
  5. Then, at the bottom of the page, scroll down to the Other Credits and Payments Smart Worksheet section and input the amount that you have calculated on Line D Claim of Right, IRC 1341 credit for repayments of past year income.
  6. Return to the interview mode by clicking on the Step-by-Step or Easy Step symbol in the top right corner of the screen. Complete your tax return by clicking on the Finish button.

Tax Help: I had to repay $30,000 to Social Security. What do I do?

Submitted by: a third party Answered at 9:26 p.m.on February 20, 2019.Special rules apply because you reimbursed a sum that you believed you had an unlimited right to and that may have been included in income (up to 85 percent) in an earlier year, notwithstanding the fact that you believed you did not.The payback will be deducted from current benefits; thus, only any excess current benefits stated in box 5 of Form SSA-1099 should be reported as income (up to 85 percent of benefits, determined under the special rules for figuring taxable Social Security benefits).If the repayment exceeds current benefits (as indicated by a negative number in Box 5 of Form SSA-1099), none of the benefits are taxable; however, if the negative amount exceeds $3,000 and it covers benefits that you included in income (up to the 85 percent maximum) in an earlier year or years, you may be eligible for an itemized deduction or tax credit in the year of repayment; the credit is calculated by recalculating the tax for the prior years.However, if the negative amount is $3,000 or less, you’re out of luck; prior to 2018, it would have been treated as a miscellaneous itemized deduction subject to the 2 percent of adjusted gross income floor, but this deduction has been suspended for 2018 through 2025 due to the abolition of the 2 percent of adjusted gross income floor.

advertisement Glossary of Tax Terms

Inclusion amount for leased cars

According to an IRS table, an amount that decreases a business deduction taken for payments on an automobile that has been leased for a minimum of 30 days is calculated. a few more expressions The Following Term

SSA-1099 or RRB-1099 – Repayment of SS or RRB Benefits

  • According to an IRS table, an amount that decreases a business deduction taken for payments on an automobile that has been leased for a minimum of 30 days is specified. Additions to the vocabulary Timetable for the Following Year
  • Drake19 To calculate the possible deduction, first check Publication 17’s ″Repayment of Benefits″ and ″Repayments More Than Gross Benefits″ sections to see if they apply to you. For amounts greater than $3,000, follow the guidelines in Publication 17 and enter the result on either screen A, line 16, or screen 5, Schedule 3, line 13. For amounts less than $3,000, see Publication 17. Code 1341 should be entered in the Form box, followed by the amount to be adjusted in the Adjustment line. IRC 1341 will be printed in its literal form on Schedule 3, line 13 of Form 1040.
  • Drake18 To calculate the possible deduction, first check Publication 17’s ″Repayment of Benefits″ and ″Repayments More Than Gross Benefits″ sections to see if they apply to you. If the amount is greater than $3,000, follow the guidelines in Publication 17 and enter the result on either screen A, line 16, or screen 5, Schedule 5, line 74. If the amount is less than $3,000, follow the directions in Publication 17. Code 1341 should be entered in the Form box, followed by the amount to be adjusted in the Adjustment line. IRC 1341 will be printed on Schedule 5, line 74 of the 1040 as the literal text. This entry will need the submission of the return on paper.
  • Drake17 and previous to that To calculate the possible deduction, first check Publication 17’s ″Repayment of Benefits″ and ″Repayments More Than Gross Benefits″ sections to see if they apply to you. To enter the deduction on screen A line 23 if it is less than $3,000, follow the instructions in Publication 17 and enter the result on either screen A line 28 or screen 5 line 73. If the deduction is greater than $3,000, follow the instructions in Publication 17 and enter the result on either screen A line 28 or screen 5 line 73. Code 1341 should be entered in the Form box, followed by the amount to be adjusted in the Adjustment line. IRC 1341 will appear on line 73 of the Form 1040 in its literal form. This entry will need the submission of the return on paper.
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10 Myths and Misconceptions About Social Security

  1. Translated into Spanish |
  2. Social Security is large and complex, with about $100 billion in benefits sent out each month to around 65 million retirees, persons with disabilities, and their dependents.
  3. According to an AARP study conducted in 2020, it is extremely popular, with support from more than 90 percent of individuals across the political spectrum in the United States.
  1. In addition, it is essential to the financial well-being of older Americans, with four out of five of those questioned expected to rely on Social Security during their later years.
  2. Given the significance of Social Security, it is reasonable that people are concerned about its present and future status.
  3. These worries are common.

As a result of these concerns, as well as the numerous modifications made to the program during its 86-year existence, there are some misunderstandings regarding how the program is funded and how it operates.The facts underlying ten of the most persistent Social Security misconceptions are presented here.

Myth1: Social Security is going broke

  1. The facts are as follows: It seems unlikely that Social Security will run out of money as long as employees and companies continue to pay payroll taxes.
  2. It operates on a pay-as-you-go basis: The revenue generated by the FICA (Federal Insurance Contributions Act) and SECA (Self-Employed Contributions Act) taxes is sufficient to fund the benefits paid out by the government.
  3. The Social Security Administration is experiencing financial difficulties.
  1. For decades, it collected more money than it spent, accumulating a surplus that was valued at $2.9 trillion by the end of the year 2020.
  2. However, the system is beginning to pay out more money than it receives, mostly because the retiree population is rising at a faster rate than the working population and surviving for longer periods of time.
  3. Unless something is done to modify the way Social Security is funded, the surplus is expected to run out in 2034.

Even in that case, Social Security will not be bankrupt.It will continue to collect taxes and make welfare payments.However, according to the most recent estimates, it will only generate enough revenue to cover 78 percent of projected benefits.

The United States Congress would have to take action to shore up Social Security’s finances, just as it did in 1983, when the program came dangerously close to depleting its reserves.The initiatives taken at that time included raising the full retirement age (see Myth2), increasing the payroll tax rate, and instituting an income tax on retirement payments (see Myth8).

Myth2: The Social Security retirement age is 65

  1. The facts are as follows: Full retirement age, or FRA, is 66 and 2 months for persons born in 1955 and 66 and 4 months for people born in 1956.
  2. Full retirement age, or FRA, is the age at which a worker qualifies to file for a benefit equal to 100 percent of his or her entire earnings history.
  3. For individuals born in 1960 and beyond, the age will rise by two months at a period over the following several years, eventually reaching 67.
  1. The age of 65 has been a long-standing Social Security reality, but it has now become a fiction.
  2. When Social Security was established in 1935, the age of eligibility was set at 65 years old.
  3. In succeeding decades, the minimum eligibility age was dropped to 62, at which point persons may claim a reduced pension, but the regular retirement age of 65 remained the same throughout.

That changed after the 1983 reorganization, which increased the retirement age in order to lower the expenditures of Social Security.It will take time for the increase to take effect; 2002 was the final year in which those reaching 65 could collect the entire amount of their pension.

Myth3: The annual COLA is guaranteed

  1. The facts are as follows: Social Security legislation has required that benefit levels be modified annually to keep pace with inflation since 1975, when the system was passed.
  2. However, there is no necessity that this cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) result in an annual rise in compensation.
  3. The COLA is connected to the CPI-W, which is a government index of prices for a limited group of consumer products and services.
  1. In each year, benefits are modified to account for increases or decreases in the CPI-W from the third quarter of one year to the third quarter of the next year.
  2. Because the index indicated a 5.9 percent increase in prices in 2021, benefits in 2022 will be 5.9 percent higher than they were in 2021.
  3. When the index does not reflect a statistically significant rise in prices — when there is no inflation — there is, in effect, no adjustment to benefit levels.
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This has happened three times since the current formula was implemented, in 2010 and 2011, and most recently in 2016.Whether or not it results in a benefit increase, this procedure is completely automated, and neither the president nor Congress are involved.It would be necessary for them to take separate action in order to adjust the COLA.

Myth4: Members of Congress don’t pay into Social Security

  1. The facts are as follows: Many people have expressed dissatisfaction with Social Security, claiming that members of Congress are unconcerned about reforming the program because it does not cover them.
  2. It does, in fact, exist.
  3. Social Security coverage for members of Congress, as well as the rest of the federal employees, was extended to them in 1984 as a result of the comprehensive reforms to the program that were approved the previous year.
  1. In the years before that, senators and representatives did not contribute to Social Security and were instead completely covered by a pension plan known as the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS).
  2. Those who were in office on January 1, 1984, were permitted to continue to participate in CSRS, but only in combination with Social Security benefits.
  3. (If you’re interested, two senators and five members of the House of Representatives are still alive from those days.) Those who have been elected since then are covered by Social Security as well as a pension scheme that has taken the place of the Civil Service Retirement System.

Members of Congress contribute to Social Security in the same manner that the majority of American employees do.

Myth5: The government raids Social Security to pay for other programs

  1. A brief summary of the information: Many people have expressed dissatisfaction with Social Security, claiming that members of Congress don’t try to repair it because it doesn’t cover them.
  2. This is true, in fact.
  3. Congress members, along with the rest of the federal employees, were covered by Social Security beginning in 1984, as a result of significant reforms to the program approved the year before.
  1. The Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS) provided complete coverage for senators and representatives prior to that date, and they were not required to pay into Social Security (CSRS).
  2. On January 1, 1984, those in office were allowed to continue in the CSRS, but only in combination with Social Security benefits, rather than on their own.
  3. For those who are interested, two senators and five members of the House of Representatives from those days are still alive and well today.

Social Security benefits, as well as a pension program that replaced the Civil Service Retirement System, are available to those who have been elected since.The vast majority of American employees, including members of Congress, pay into Social Security.

Myth6: Undocumented immigrants drain Social Security

  1. The facts are as follows: The undocumented immigrants who are depleting the system’s resources, according to some, are to blame for the financial issues that Social Security is experiencing.
  2. A common complaint, but one that is completely unfounded.
  3. Foreign nationals who lawfully reside and work in the United States are eligible for Social Security benefits under the same conditions as native-born and naturalized citizens, but unauthorized immigrants are not eligible for benefits.
  1. There is evidence to suggest that illegal employees really help to enhance the bottom line of Social Security.
  2. Some people do get Social Security numbers under false pretenses, and payroll taxes are taken from their salaries despite the fact that they are ineligible to claim benefits later on in life.
  3. Undocumented immigrants made a net contribution of around $12 billion to the Social Security program in 2010, according to a research by Social Security actuaries, and their earnings are expected to continue to ″benefit the financial position″ of the program.

Myth7: Social Security is like a retirement savings account

  1. A brief summary of the information: The undocumented immigrants who are depleting the system’s resources, according to some, are to blame for Social Security’s financial woes.
  2. A common complaint, yet one that is completely unfounded and unjustified.
  3. Citizens of other countries who lawfully reside and work in the United States are eligible for Social Security benefits under the same conditions as native-born and naturalized citizens, but unauthorized immigrants cannot claim benefits.
  1. According to some studies, illegal labor actually contribute to the overall health of Social Security.
  2. Some people do get Social Security numbers under false pretenses, and payroll taxes are taken from their paychecks despite the fact that they are ineligible to claim benefits in the future.
  3. The Social Security Administration said in 2010 that illegal immigrants made a net contribution to the program of around $12 billion, and that their wages would likely continue to ″help the financial situation″ of Social Security in the future.

Myth8: You don’t pay taxes on Social Security benefits

  1. The facts are as follows: This was true until 1984.
  2. One of the provisions of the Social Security reform legislation enacted by Congress and signed by President Ronald Reagan the year before was that a percentage of Social Security payments would be taxed, depending on your income level.
  3. In the event that your income for the year is between $25,000 and $34,000 for an individual filer and $32,000 to $44,000 for a couple filing jointly, you will be required to pay federal income tax on up to 50% of your benefits.
  1. If you earn more than those levels, up to 85 percent of your benefits may be taxed.
  2. You owe nothing to the IRS on your benefits if you fall inside these guidelines.
  3. The money you get from employment, pensions, and investments, as well as nontaxable interest, and half of your Social Security payments, are all included as income by Social Security.

If you reside in Colorado, Connecticut, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, Rhode Island, Vermont, Utah, or West Virginia, you may also be liable for state income taxes on your Social Security benefits if you receive them.Their regulations on taxing benefits differ from state to state; for further information, contact your state’s tax department.

Myth9: An ex-spouse’s benefits come out of your own

  1. Information on your former spouse’s eligibility to claim Social Security payments based on your earnings record if you are divorced (and vice versa).
  2. Benefits for a current spouse can be as much as 50 percent of the benefit amount you are entitled to at full retirement age, much as benefits for a former spouse.
  3. However, those payments from your ex-husband (or spouse) do not affect your Social Security income.
  1. Because they are separate payments, they have no influence on the amount of money you get each month, even if you are receiving payments from both your current and past husbands (or numerous former spouses).
  2. You get the benefit to which you are entitled, which is determined by your earnings history and the age at which you file for Social Security benefits.

Myth10: You lose benefits permanently if you keep working

  1. The facts are as follows: Social Security has a guideline known as the ″earnings limit″ or ″earnings test″ that allows those who are still working to have their benefits reduced for a period of time.
  2. However, it does not apply to all working recipients, and it is not a long-term solution.
  3. The law applies solely to persons who claim benefits before reaching full retirement age while continuing to work.
  1. During this time period, Social Security withholds a percentage of benefits if your earnings from employment exceed a predetermined limit.
  2. This limit changes every year and varies based on how near you are to reaching full retirement age.
  3. It is possible that you will not reach full retirement age until 2022 or later, in which case your benefit will be decreased by $1 for every $2 in income exceeding $19,560 in 2022.

The formula for calculating benefits if you will reach FRA in 2022 is $1 less in benefits for every $3 in earnings in excess of $51,960.The earnings test is no longer in effect on the date you reach FRA; therefore, there is no benefit decrease, regardless of your income.In addition, Social Security raises your payment higher over time, allowing you to reclaim the money that was withheld from you.

NOTE FROM THE EDITOR: This story, which was initially published on August 25, 2020, has been amended to reflect more current facts.Andy Markowitz is a contributing writer and editor for AARP, where he focuses on issues such as Social Security and identity theft.He used to be the editor of The Prague Post and the Baltimore City Paper, among other publications.

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