Where Do I Mail My Florida Tax Return? (Correct answer)

Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, New Jersey, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia: Internal Revenue Service, P.O. Box 931000, Louisville, KY 40293-1000. Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, Texas: Internal Revenue Service, P.O. Box 1214, Charlotte, NC 28201-1214.

  • What address do i send my tax return i live in Florida. You will mail your return to the following IRS address if you live in Florida. If you are enclosing payment. Department of the Treasury. Internal Revenue Service. Austin, TX 73301-0002. If you are not enclosing payment. Department of the Treasury. P.O. Box 1214.

Do I have to mail in my Florida tax return?

No, you do not need to mail in a Florida individual income tax return. As you are aware, Florida doesn’t have state income tax and so you do not need to file an individual income tax return.

How do I send my federal tax return by mail?

If your tax return is postmarked by the filing date deadline, the IRS considers it on time. Mail your return in a USPS blue collection box or at a Postal location that has a pickup time before the deadline. Some Post Office locations offer extended hours and late postmarking for tax filers.

Can I mail my tax return in a regular envelope?

Yes, you can use any color envelope. It’s also a good idea to mail your return using certified mail or a mailing service such as UPS or FedEx. This ensures you get a confirmation that the IRS received it.

Can I still mail my 2019 tax return?

Yes.

What phone number is 800 829 0922?

If you want to call the IRS, make sure you call the right number: 800-829-0922. The letter says you have 60 days from the date of the letter to appeal or you can sue in federal court. You may want to hire a tax professional and you may qualify for low-income taxpayer clinics. They’re free or close to free.

How do I file a Florida tax return?

Since Florida does not collect an income tax on individuals, you are not required to file a FL State Income Tax Return. However, you may need to prepare and e-file a Federal Income Tax Return.

Do you file a state tax return in Florida?

Because Florida doesn’t tax personal income at the state level, you do not have to complete a Florida state income tax return as an individual.

Do Florida residents file state tax returns?

Florida State Tax: Florida does not have a state income tax. Florida Corporate Income Tax: Corporations that do business and earn income in Florida must file a corporate income tax return (unless they are exempt).

How late can I mail my taxes today?

For example, if your post office is open until 9 p.m. on Tax Day 2021, but the last collection time is 7 p.m., you’ll need to get to the post office to mail your taxes before 7 p.m. to meet the May 17 tax postmark deadline. Otherwise, your taxes will be mailed out on May 18. Watch out for common tax-filing mistakes.

What is the first day you can mail in federal and state paper form tax returns for the previous year?

Generally you can paper file your tax return on January 1st of the following year. But if, like most tax payers, you file an electronic return (e-file) you can only submit your return to the IRS in late January, which is when the IRS starts accepting electronic returns.

FLORIDA – Where to File Addresses for Taxpayers and Tax Professionals

and you are filing a Form. and youARE NOTENCLOSING A PAYMENT, then use this address. and youAREENCLOSING A PAYMENT, then use this address.
1040 Department of the TreasuryInternal Revenue ServiceAustin, TX 73301-0002 Internal Revenue ServiceP.O. Box 1214Charlotte, NC 28201-1214
1040-ES N/A Internal Revenue ServiceP.O. Box 1300Charlotte, NC 28201-1300
1040-ES(NR) N/A Internal Revenue ServiceP.O. Box 1300Charlotte, NC 28201-1300
1040V N/A Internal Revenue ServiceP.O. Box 1214Charlotte, NC 28201-1214
1040-X Department of the TreasuryInternal Revenue ServiceAustin, TX 73301-0052 Department of the TreasuryInternal Revenue ServiceAustin, TX 73301 – 0052
4868 Department of the TreasuryInternal Revenue ServiceAustin, TX 73301-0045 Internal Revenue ServiceP.O. Box 1302Charlotte, NC 28201-1302

Page was last reviewed or updated on December 10, 2021.

Where to File Paper Tax Returns With or Without a Payment

Addresses by state for Form 1040, 1040-SR, 1040ES, 1040V, amended returns, and extensions (also addresses for taxpayers in foreign countries, U.S. possessions, or with other international filing characteristics)Taxpayers or Tax Professionals can use certainPrivate Delivery Services (PDS)designated by the IRS to meet the “timely mailing as timely filing/paying” rule for tax returns and payments.
  • The states of Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, and the District of Columbia
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Hawaii
  • Idaho
  • Illinois
  • Indiana
  • Iowa
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky
  • Louisiana
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Mississippi
  • Missouri
  • Montana
  • Nebraska
  • Nevada
  • North Carolina
  • North Dakota
  • Ohio
  • Oklahoma
  • Oregon
  • Pennsylvania
  • Rhode Island and the state of South Carolina.

Form Number

Mailing addresses for all types of returns: individual, corporation, partnership, and many others. Each form has its own page with the needed address for example1040,1040-SR,1040X,7004and941.

Tax Exempt and Government Entities

Where to file addresses for tax exempt and government entities.

Page was last reviewed or updated on November 30, 2021.

A State-by-State Guide for Each IRS Mailing Address

When tax season comes around, there’s a lot to consider and consider carefully. Considering everything from figuring out the forms you’ll need to fill out for each of your employees while keeping track of changes in tax laws to ensuring that you’ve reported all of your numbers correctly, the last thing you want to think about is the IRS mailing address where you’ll be sending your tax returns. If you’re looking for the IRS mailing address, it might be tough because there are so many different addresses based on where you reside.

Don’t let your greatest staff go to waste.

Can you file a paper tax return?

The majority of individuals opt for electronic filing or hiring a professional accountant, but submitting your income taxes by mail and doing it yourself is still an absolutely viable option. However, although filing the old-fashioned method protects you against hacking dangers, paper filing is more time-consuming, which means you may have to wait longer for your refund if you expect to receive one.

Where do I send my 1040EZ form?

Regardless of the version of the 1040 form you use (the specific form you use will depend on how you’re filing), your 1040 form must be mailed to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) once it has been completed. The answer to this question, on the other hand, is dependent on your geographical location. You can use the information provided below to establish the postal address for the Internal Revenue Service.

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Where do I mail my tax forms?

For your convenience, we’ve compiled a list of every IRS mailing address you’ll need to use when submitting the 1040EZ form, which differs from state to state.

Here’s where you want to send your forms if youarenotenclosing a payment:

  • : (812) 64999-0014
  • (812) 73301-0014
  • Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, New Mexico, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming: (812) 73301-0014
  • And (812) 73301-0014
  • (812) 73301

Here’s where you want to send your forms if youareenclosing a payment:

  • Internal Revenue Service: P.O. Box 931000, Louisville, KY 40293-1000
  • Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, Texas: Internal Revenue Service: P.O. Box 1214, Charlotte, NC 28201-1214
  • Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming: Internal Revenue Service: P.O. Box 7704, San Francisco, CA 94120-7704
  • Arkansas, Illinois, Indian Territory: Internal Revenue Service: P.O. Box 770

The Internal Revenue Service’s website provides a helpful explanation of where each 1040 income tax form should be sent, with the majority of the information based on whether or not a payment is included. Bookmark(0)

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Cinnamon Janzer

CINNAMON JANZER is a journalist and content writer that works out of Minneapolis, Minnesota. Since 2019, she has contributed to Workest as a valuable writer.

Florida Dept. of Revenue – General Tax Administration Contacts

Mailing Address for Tax Payments:Florida Department of Revenue5050 W Tennessee StTallahassee, FL 32399-0100

Contact

Taxpayer AssistanceSearch Frequently Asked QuestionsorAsk a Tax QuestionCall 850-488-6800 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. ET Monday-FridayFAX 850-245-5990Florida Relay Service 711800-955-8771 (TTY) Taxpayer Assistance can provide answers to questions about:
  • Taxes and fees
  • Forms
  • Bills
  • Delinquency notifications
  • Credits
  • Publications
  • And other related information. Using electronic filing and payment methods
  • Registration for the purpose of filing and paying taxes
Contact the Department by MailTaxpayer ServicesFlorida Department of RevenueMail Stop 3-20005050 W Tennessee StTallahassee, FL 32399-0112 When sending correspondence to the Department, please include:
  • Name of the person to contact
  • Telephone number(s)
  • Type of taxation
  • Provide a thorough explanation of why you are contacting the Department. Name and address of the business
  • Tax identification number(s) if applicable
  • And
Verify Annual Resale CertificateOr Call 877-357-3725 24 Hours a Day, 7 Days a Week (Automated System) This application can verify a purchaser’s:
  • A Certificate of Exemption
  • An Annual Resale Certificate for sales tax
  • An Annual Resale Certificate for communications services tax
  • And other documents.
RefundsHow to Apply OnlineApply for Sales and Use Tax, Prepaid Wireless E911, orSurtax RefundApply for Other Taxes Refund(Except propertytax)Check the Status of a RefundOr Call 850-617-8585 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. ET Monday – Friday Refunds can assist with:
  • Questions about tax refunds, including how to apply for a tax refund (other than property tax) and how to check the status of a refund claim
Florida’s Taxpayers’ Rights Advocate850-617-81688:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. ET Monday – FridayOr send correspondence to:Office of Taxpayers’ Rights AdvocatePO Box 5906Tallahassee, FL 32314-5906 Florida’s Taxpayers’ Rights Advocate assists with:
  • Making certain that taxpayers’ privacy and assets are safeguarded during the tax assessment, collection, refund rejection, and enforcement procedures is essential. For additional information, please see the website of the Office of Taxpayers’ Rights Advocate.
Technical Assistance and Dispute Resolution(All Taxes Except Property Tax)850-617-8346 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. ET Monday – FridayOr send correspondence to:Florida Department of RevenuePO Box 7443Tallahassee, FL 32314-7443 Technical Assistance and Dispute Resolutioncan provide:
  • In written form, answers to written requests for technical advice on the tax ramifications of a given transaction or activity within the provisions of current legislation, regulations, or policies
  • The use of unofficial administrative protest methods for the resolution of complaints pertaining to the assessment of tax and penalty and interest, as well as the rejection of refunds, are permitted. Legal, legally enforceable opinions made in accordance with the terms of Rule 12-11 of the Florida Administrative Code
Taxpayer Service CentersOpen 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Local Time Visit or call for assistance with:
  • Questions about taxes and fees
  • Registration for the purpose of filing and paying taxes
  • Forming and submitting tax returns
  • Submitting tax returns and payments to the IRS
  • Billing questions, delinquency notifications, and credit inquiries
Help Us Improve the General Tax Administration Website Please fill out a brief survey about your most recent experience with the General Tax Administration’s website.Your response will provide valuable feedback and enable the Department to better serve you in the future.

Where and how to mail your federal tax return

It’s going down to the wire if you want to file your tax returns by the deadline. According to the United States Postal Service, your return must be postmarked by April 15, have the necessary postage, and be addressed correctly in order to be deemed timely by the Internal Revenue Service. Make careful to weigh your return to ensure that you receive the correct postage. Most returns weigh more than one ounce, so you’ll need more than a stamp to complete the transaction. If you do not have enough postage for your return, it will be returned to the sender.

On Tax Day, several post offices will be open for extended hours and will allow for late postmarking.

To discover out, give us a call. There isn’t a single IRS mailing address. Choosing which one to utilize is determined on where you’re submitting your return from and whether or not your return includes a payment. According to the Internal Revenue Service, here is where you should submit yours.

Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, New Jersey, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia

Treasury Department, Internal Revenue Service, and other government agencies without payment Kansas City, Missouri 64999-0002 (USA) The Internal Revenue Service can be reached at: PO Box 931000 Louisville, KY 40293-0000 with payment.

Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas

Treasury Department, Internal Revenue Service, and other government agencies without payment Austin, Texas 73301-0002 (Texas) The Internal Revenue Service, P.O. Box 1214, Charlotte, NC 28201-1214, will accept payment.

Alaska,Arizona, California,Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, New Mexico, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming

Without payment: Internal Revenue Service, Department of the Treasury, Fresno, CA 93888-0002, Department of the Treasury Send payment to: Internal Revenue Service, P.O. Box 7704, San Francisco, CA 94120-7704, with the following information:

Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska,North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and Wisconsin

Without payment: Internal Revenue Service, Department of the Treasury, Fresno, CA 93888-0002, Department of the Treasury Send payment to: Internal Revenue Service, P.O. Box 802501, Cincinnati, OH 45280-2501, along with your letter.

Delaware, Maine, Massachusetts, Missouri, New Hampshire, New York, and Vermont

Treasury Department, Internal Revenue Service, and other government agencies without payment Kansas City, Missouri 64999-0002 (USA) To receive a refund, send your money to: Internal Revenue Service P.O. Box 37008 Hartford, CT 06176-7008

Connecticut, District of Columbia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and West Virginia

In the absence of payment, please contact: Department of the Treasury Internal Revenue Service Ogden, UT 84201-0002 Send payment to: Internal Revenue Service, P.O. Box 37910, Hartford, CT 06176-7910, with the following information:

General Information & Available Resources – Division of Corporations

DOING BUSINESS IN THE STATE OF FLORIDA

IRS – Business Tax Compliancy

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) is a federal government organization in the United States that is in charge of tax collection and the administration of tax law.

  • Starting a business
  • Reviewing and establishing taxation
  • Small Business/Self-Employed Tax Centers are available. How to apply for an Employer Identification Number (EIN) and what documents to provide
  • Form SS-4 – Application for Employer Identification Number (needs identification of responsible party)
  • Revised Form SS-4 – Application for Employer Identification Number (requires identification of responsible party)
  • Employer Identification Number (EIN) applications are subject to change, as is the use of nominees in the EIN application process
  • Incorrect business entity information must be corrected.

Business Registration

Along with registration with the Department of State, most professions also need registration with the Department of Business and Professional Regulation. Businesses in Florida may be required to register with the county in which they operate. County occupational licenses are normally obtained through the county government in the area where the license is needed.

  • Division of Workers’ Compensation
  • Division of Business and Professional Regulation
  • Division of Corporations
  • Division of Workers’ Compensation
  • Division of Workers

Other resources to consider:

  • BusinessUSA.gov — A one-stop shop for accessing business-related services
  • BusinessUSA.gov Florida Trend’s – Florida Small Business Resource
  • Florida Chamber of Commerce
  • Division of Library and Information Services – Small Business Resource Guide
  • Florida Trend’s – Florida Small Business Resource

Florida Tax Registration

It is critical for businesses to be aware of the taxes that they are responsible for collecting and remitting to the State of Florida. Florida Department of Revenue is a good place to start if you want to find out more about registering for Florida taxes and how to do so.

  • Department of Revenue – Contact Information
  • Department of Revenue – Tax Questions
  • Department of Revenue – Tax Forms and Publications

Selecting a Location

In the business sector, the location of a company may have an impact on the quality and quantity of services and goods offered. Identifying the location of your target population for your goods and services is another important factor to consider. Other factors to consider are availability to major transportation routes and qualified labor. All of these factors might have an influence on your company’s capacity to expand and conduct business in Florida.

  • Florida’s Economy – Facts and Highlights
  • Florida’s Transportation Advantages
  • Florida Demographics
  • Florida Chamber of Commerce
  • Florida’s Economy – Facts and Highlights

International Trade Information

International trade is a significant source of revenue in Florida.

Global trade is supported by our deep-water ports and international air transportation systems, which handle massive quantities. Florida has 21 foreign trade zones, which are great for enterprises in the import-export market since they are located in strategic locations.

  • The International Trade Administration of the United States Department of Commerce

Land UsePermitting

Businesses in Florida are held accountable for their influence on the environment, as well as for their compliance with municipal land use rules and code requirements. Environmental problems such as surface and groundwater quality, wastewater treatment, solid waste disposal, natural habitat conservation and even the placement of signage on public right-of-ways are just a few of the issues that businesses may be requested to solve.

  • Publications and Reports from the Department of Environmental Protection
  • Rules from the Department of Environmental Protection
  • Program Contacts from the Department of Environmental Protection
  • Permit Information from the Department of Environmental Protection
  • And more. Department of Transportation – Guide to Outdoor Advertising
  • Department of Transportation – Encroachment Brochure

Assistance Programs

Florida is dedicated to fostering an environment that encourages economic growth and job creation. Therefore, programs of assistance are available to support minority-owned firms, rural economic development, small enterprises, and other sectors of the business community.

  • Business Enterprise Florida
  • The Department of Management Services – Office of Supplier Diversity
  • Small Business Assistance – North Florida
  • Small Business Assistance – South Florida
  • Small Business Assistance – Central Florida

Industry Reports

Numerous business benefits are available in Florida, including a favorable corporate tax structure, 21 international trade zones, a huge population of skilled employees, and more. Florida offers everything a company could possibly need to succeed.

  • Why Florida, according to Enterprise Trends Florida’s Education and Workforce
  • Florida’s Business Environment
  • Florida’s Education and Workforce
  • Economic and business news from Florida Trend
  • The University of Florida’s Bureau of Economic and Business Research
  • And other sources.

International Services

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) requires you to submit one form, Form 8843, to the IRS (Internal Revenue Service) if you were physically present in the United States in F or J status between January 1 and December 31, 2021, regardless of whether you earned any money. If you earn more than $0 in income from sources in the United States during the tax season of 2021, you may be required to file a federal tax return with the Internal Revenue Service. According on your specific circumstances, you may possibly be required to file a state tax return as well (s).

  • For taxation reasons, the vast majority of overseas students and scholars who are in the country on an F, J, M, or Q visa are considered non-residents.
  • In the event that you have been in the United States for more than the 5 or 2 year periods, the Substantial Presence Testwill be used to assess your tax residence status.
  • Individual tax advice is not something that we (or any other university personnel) are authorized or permitted to do.
  • Sprintax will then decide whether or not you are subject to taxation.
  • Sprintax will complete and create the IRS paperwork that you will need to print, sign, and send to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) (Internal Revenue Service).

If the program concludes that you are a resident alien for federal tax reasons, you will not be allowed to continue using the product until the issue is resolved.

Step by Step guide on How to File Your Non-Resident Tax Forms (F and J)

You will get an email from the foreign student office with a link to the USF Sprintax website, which is where you will complete the registration process for your account. This page will cover the costs of filing your federal tax return and completing Form 8843 at no additional charge to you. Creating a UserID and password will allow you to register for a new Sprintax account. If you already have a Sprintax account, you may log in using your current credentials. If you did not have any income in the United States, Sprintax will prepare a Form 8843 for you and each of your dependents (if you have any).

After you have completed your federal tax return, Sprintax will notify you whether you are required to file a state tax return.

You will be given the option to utilize Sprintax for a price if this page applies to you, and you will be given the choice to do so.

Keep in mind to carefully follow the sending instructions provided by Sprintax.

Need Sprintax Support?

If you need assistance while using Sprintax, you may reach out to them at: Help is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week via Live Chat. Please see theirFAQs or send an email to [email protected]

Sprintax Educational Tax Videos and Blog:

There are a variety of instructive films on Non-Resident Taxes available on the Sprintax YouTube channel, which will help you gain a better understanding of the issue of utilizing Sprintax and Non-Resident Taxes. The Sprintax Blog is another resource that might be of use to you as you navigate through tax-related subjects.

Tax Resources at USF

For international students and scholars, the Office of International Services offers an optional class entitled Understanding Tax Requirements in the United States for International Students and Scholars. This session is intended for students and researchers who are filing their taxes in the United States for the first time. It includes a general FAQ section as well as a quick Sprintax lesson to get them up to speed. The following dates have been set aside for the spring sessions this year:

  • Friday, January 21 at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Standard Time
  • Tuesday, January 25 at 10:30 a.m. Eastern Standard Time
  • Monday, January 31 at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Standard Time
  • Monday, February 7 at 12:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time
  • Thursday, February 10 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time

Unless otherwise noted, all of the sessions will be hosted on Microsoft Teams. To register, go to bit.ly/oistaxes. Following the start of Tax Season, the Office of Foreign Services will also be hosting numerous Sprintax Software Assistance Sessions every week to assist international students and scholars with the use of their non-resident tax preparation tool, Sprintax Non-Resident Tax Preparation.

Staff members will be on hand to assist you with reading your immigration paperwork, clarifying instructions, and delivering a quick Sprintax training, among other things. These seminars will be available on the following days and at the following times:

  • The following dates and times are scheduled: Tuesday, February 15 at 2:00 PM Eastern Time
  • Thursday, February 17 at 1:00 PM Eastern Time
  • Monday, February 21 at 4:00 PM Eastern Time
  • Wednesday, February 23 at 11:00 AM Eastern Time
  • Tuesday, March 1 at 10:00 AM Eastern Time
  • Friday, March 4 at 1:00 PM Eastern Time
  • Monday, March 7 at 9:00 AM Eastern Time
  • Wednesday, March 9 at 3:00 PM Eastern Time
  • Tuesday, March 22 at 1:30 PM Eastern Time
  • Thursday, March 24 at 4:00 PM Eastern Time

Unless otherwise noted, all of the sessions will be hosted on Microsoft Teams. To register, go to bit.ly/oistaxes. The Sprintax non-resident tax specialists are giving a number of webinars for foreign students and researchers during the tax season if you want to learn from them directly. You are welcome to attend these workshops at no cost, but you must RSVP by clicking on the links below. An overview of taxes for nonresident students and scholars, who is required to file a 2021 US tax return, what income forms students and scholars may receive, the forms that must be completed and sent to the IRS, terms such as FICA and ITIN, what happens if students do not file or misfile, state tax returns, IRS stimulus payments, and a Sprintax overview are among the topics that will be covered.

  • Register here for the following dates and times: Thursday, November 4th @ 1:00 PM EST
  • Thursday, December 9th @ 12:00 PM EST
  • Wednesday, January 12th @ 1:00 PM EST
  • Thursday, January 27th @ 12:00 PM EST
  • Wednesday, February 2nd @ 1:00 PM EST
  • Thursday, February 10th @ 12:00 PM EST –Register here
  • Wednesday, February 23rd @ 12:00 PM EST –Register here
  • Wednesday, March 23rd @ 12:00 PM EST – The event will take place on Wednesday, March 2nd at 3:00 PM Eastern Standard Time (register here)
  • And Tuesday, March 15th at 1:00 PM Eastern Standard Time (register here). EDT – Please register here
  • Thursday, March 24th at 3:00 PM EDT – Please register here Sign up here
  • Wednesday, March 30th @ 12:00 PM EDT – Sign up here
  • Wednesday, April 6th @ 1:00 PM EDT – Sign up here
  • Tuesday, April 12th @ 1:00 PM PMEDT – Sign up here
  • Thursday, April 14th @ 12:00 PM EDT – Sign up here

USF PayrollTax Services for Nonresidents

The IRS Tax Withholding Estimator, information on tax treaties, and extra information on paying taxes as a nonresident may all be found at this link.

DISCLAIMER:

There is no way for the Office of International Services and the University of South Florida to help a student or scholar with any IRS tax form preparation or with any tax-related inquiries they may have. The information provided is meant to be of assistance to you. Sprintax, a professional tax preparer, or a local IRS field office should be contacted if you have any questions or concerns about your taxes.

Individual Income Tax – Louisiana Department of Revenue

  1. In order to submit a federal income tax return for Louisiana residents, Louisiana part-year residents, and nonresidents having income from Louisiana sources, you must first complete and file a Louisiana Individual Income Tax Return. In order to get a refund or credit, taxpayers who have overpaid their taxes through withholding or the declaration of estimated tax are need to file a return. Anyone who is obligated to file a federal income tax return but whose domicile (house of record) is in Louisiana and who is compelled to do so must submit a return and declare their whole income, regardless of where they were stationed.

Due Date of Returns and Payments

In the next year, returns and payments must be submitted on or by May 15th of that year. Returns and payments for fiscal year taxpayers are due on the 15th day of the fifth month after the end of the fiscal year in which they were filed.

Determination of Tax

The tax is calculated by referring to tax tables provided by the Louisiana Department of Revenue (LDOR). Based on the taxpayer’s filing status as well as the taxpayer’s Louisiana taxable income, a graded scale is employed to determine the tax rate. Tax rates have changed recently, and the following changes are reflected in the figures:

Rate of tax
Effective January 1, 2009 Effective January 1, 2022
Single, married filing separately, or head of household:
First $12,500 2 percent 1.85 percent
Next $37,500 4 percent 3.50 percent
Over $50,000 6 percent 4.25 percent
Married filing jointly or qualified surviving spouse:
First $25,000 2 percent 1.85 percent
Next $75,000 4 percent 3.50 percent
Over $100,000 6 percent 4.25 percent

Requesting an Extension of Time for Filing a Return

In accordance with Revised Statute 47:103, an extension of time to file an individual income tax return of up to six months may be allowed upon request. The request for an extension must be submitted before the state tax filing deadline, which is May 15th for calendar year filers and the 15th day of the fifth month after the completion of a fiscal year for those who file on a quarterly basis. The following are the five possibilities available for obtaining an extension:

  1. Filing an extension request electronically through the Louisiana Department of Revenue’s Individual Income Online Tax Filing application or the Online Extension Filing application
  2. Filing an extension request electronically through the Louisiana Department of Revenue’s Interactive Voice Response phone system by calling 225-922-3270 or 888-829-3071
  3. If you want to make an extension request, choose option3, then option 1. When requesting an extension, taxpayers will need to provide their social security number as well as the principal account holder. Making a state extension request through the Louisiana Department of Revenue by “checking the state extension box” included in the tax preparation software for an electronically-filed return
  4. Making a state paper extension request on Form R-2868, Application for Extension of Time to File Louisiana Individual Income Tax
  5. Or making a federal paper extension request (Form R-4868, Application for Automatic Extension of Time to File United States Individual Income Tax Return)

Tax preparers who are subject to the electronic filing obligation set out in LAC 61:III.1501 are required to submit all extension requests over the internet. To file numerous extension requests, tax preparers can use the bulk extension filing application, which is available on the IRS website. This program can be utilized by any company that has registered for an Electronic Filing Identification Number (EFIN) with the Louisiana Department of Revenue (LDR), as well as by any taxpayer who has a current Louisiana Account Number on file with the LDR.

An extension does not entitle the bearer to a further extension of time to pay the tax owed. The interest and late payment penalty will be applied to any payments received after the return due date has passed. the top of the page

Resident Individual Income Tax

Residents who are obliged to submit a federal individual income tax return are also required to file a Louisiana income tax return, IT-540, on which they must record all of their earned income, as well. Louisiana residents who make money in another state are subject to Louisiana’s taxation on the earnings from that other state. A brief absence from Louisiana does not automatically result in a change in your state of residence for the purposes of individual income taxation. In Louisiana, you are entitled to a credit on Schedule G for any net tax liability you have paid to another state provided the income from that state is reflected on your Louisiana return as a resident taxpayer.

A deduction of up to $30,000 is available to Louisiana citizens serving in the military forces who were stationed outside the state on active duty for a period of 120 or more consecutive days during the tax year.

the top of the page

Nonresident and Part-Year Resident Individual Income Tax

Nonresident and part-year resident taxpayers who are obliged to file a federal individual income tax return are also required to submit a Louisiana individual income tax return, IT-540B, on which they must record any income obtained from sources in Louisiana. It is necessary to record all income from all sources in order to calculate the ratio of Louisiana adjusted gross income to federal adjusted gross income for the purposes of the IT-540B computation. Only income derived from Louisiana sources, on the other hand, is subject to taxation.

Nonresidents who obtain gaming wins from Louisiana sources and who are obliged to submit a federal income tax return are also required to file a Louisiana income tax return, which reports the Louisiana income generated on the winnings.

Employees of the military whose domicile (house of record) is located outside of Louisiana are not obliged to submit a Louisiana income tax return on the salary they earn while serving in the armed forces.

In order to compute the amount of Louisiana tax payable based on the amount of their Louisiana taxable income, nonresident and part-year resident taxpayers must utilize the Tax Computation Worksheet, which is available online.

Each dependant, as well as each taxpayer and/or spouse over the age of 65 or who is blind, receives a $1,000 tax credit that is applied in assessing the amount of tax owed on his or her behalf. the top of the page

Nonresident Athlete Individual Income Tax

A nonresident individual who is a member of one or more of the following organizations is considered a professional athlete and is required to electronically submit a Louisiana income tax return, IT-540B, declaring any income obtained from sources within the state of Louisiana:

  • The Professional Golfers Association of America, also known as the PGA Tour, Inc., the National Football League, the National Basketball Association, the National Hockey League, the East Coast Hockey League, and the Pacific Coast League are among the organizations represented.

Earnings from Louisiana-based sources include remuneration for services given as a professional athlete as well as all other money derived from Louisiana-based sources such as endorsements, royalties, and promotional advertising, among others. It is necessary to divide the number of Louisiana Duty Days by the total number of Duty Days in order to calculate the revenue from compensation. An athlete’s “duty days” are defined as the number of days during which he or she participated as an athlete, beginning with formal preseason training and ending with their last game in which they played or were due to play, whichever comes first.

In accordance with the filing status, the Tax Computation Worksheet permits a deduction for a Personal Exemption.

Professional athletes, defined as residents of the state who are members of one of the organizations listed above, must electronically submit a Louisiana income tax return, Form IT-540, detailing all of their earnings.

Declaration of Estimated Tax

According to Louisiana Revised Statute 47:116, taxpayers who expect their estimated Louisiana income tax after credits and taxes withheld to be more than $1,000 for single filers and $2,000 for joint filers must file a declaration of estimated income tax and make estimated tax payments to the Louisiana Department of Revenue. Residents should utilize the current year’s Income Tax Tables to estimate their income tax burden based on the anticipated amount of Louisiana taxable income in order to determine the projected tax.

In order to get general information on the calculation and payment of estimated tax, refer to the estimated payment instructions, Form IT-540ES (I).

Farmers and fishermen are entitled to special protections.

If a person files their individual income tax return before March 1st of the subsequent taxable year and pays the complete amount owed, Revised Statute 47:116(F) provides an exemption from the obligation to make estimated tax payments.

It is not possible to avoid the underpayment penalty if you failed to pay the estimated income tax that was due earlier in the year by filing a declaration, amended declaration, or paying the last installment on time by January 15th, or by filing an income tax return on time by January 31st, or by paying the last installment on time by January 31st.

Options for Estimated Tax Payments— Taxpayers have the option of paying the anticipated tax through one of the following methods:

  1. Electronically with the use of Louisiana File Online
  2. By credit card through the use of Official Payments
  3. Utilizing the Louisiana Estimated Tax Declaration Voucher for Individuals, FormIT-540ES, you can file your return by mail. Make checks payable to the Department of Revenue if you want to pay by check. Please do not send cash.

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Penalty For Failure to Pay or Underpayment of Estimated Tax

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  1. If no return was filed, the underpayment is the difference between the installment amount that would have been required if the estimated tax had been 90 percent (66.66 percent for qualified farmers and fishermen) of the tax due for the previous taxable year or, if no return was filed, 90 percent (66.66 percent for qualified farmers and fishermen) of the tax due for the current year, and the installment amount that was paid on or before the last date prescribed for the payment. The needed installment amount is equal to 25 percent of the required yearly payment for the purpose of calculating the underpayment amount.

Definition of the Underpayment Period— The underpayment period runs from the day on which a payment was due to the date on which the payment was not received, whichever is earlier:

  1. Either the 15th day of the fourth month following the end of the taxable year
  2. Or, the date on which any portion of the underpayment is paid up to the amount of the payment

Exceptions to the underpayment of estimated tax penalty—If no declaration of estimated tax is required to be filed because the taxpayer did not reasonably expect their taxes to exceed $1,000 for single filers and $2,000 for joint filers as required by Revised Statute 47:116(A), or if the total amount of all estimated tax payments made on or before the last date prescribed for the payment of the installment equals or exceeds the amount of the installment, the underpayment of estimated tax penalty will not be imposed on the installment.

  1. What would have been required to be paid on or before the due date if the projected tax had been the lesser of either one of the following amounts:
  • If the individual submitted a tax return for the prior year and the year was a taxable year of 12 months, the tax owed on that year’s return is calculated as follows: either the tax that would have been due for the preceding taxable year based on the taxpayer’s status and personal exemptions and credits for dependents, as well as the facts shown on his return
  • Or, ninety percent (66.66 percent for qualified farmers and fishermen) of the tax due on an annualized basis for each quarterly period
  1. 90 percent of the tax computed at the appropriate rates on the basis of actual taxable income for the months in the taxable year ending before the month in which the installment is due

Notification of Unpaid Tax Penalty Due to Underpayment of Estimated Tax Taxpayers who file an individual income tax return with a payment in excess of $1,000 for single filers and $2,000 for joint filers will be advised of the necessity to complete and submit an estimated tax declaration, as well as the payment of any estimated tax. An assessment of underpayment of anticipated tax penalty will be made based on the amount of underpayment and the length of time that the underpayment occurred. Request for Waiver of Penalties The form R-20128 (Request for Waiver of Penalties) and form R-210R (for residents) or R-210NR (for nonresidents/part-year residents) must be completed by the taxpayer in order for the penalty to be waived.

For example, if it can be demonstrated that the individual acted in good faith and that his or her failure to make the estimated payments was due to extraordinary circumstances beyond the individual’s control, or if it can be demonstrated that the individual made a declaration and paid estimated tax in accordance with the provisions of R.S.

It will be rejected if it is found that the individual acted with deliberate contempt for the laws of the state in which he or she resides.

Filing an Amended Return

If you submit your Louisiana income tax return and subsequently discover that you need to make changes to your income, deductions, or credits, you must file an updated (corrected) Louisiana income tax return to reflect the changes. To file an updated return on paper, follow these steps:

  1. Use either Form IT-540, Resident Return, or Form IT-540B, Nonresident and Part-year Resident Return, depending on which form is appropriate for your situation. A distinct form for amending a return does not exist in Louisiana
  2. Instead, Make sure you are using the right form for the tax year you are making the change. Filing the revised return as though the original return had not been submitted is the correct procedure. Do not make any modifications for refunds that have already been received or payments that have already been paid. The return should be clearly marked with a “X” in the “Amended Return” field to indicate that it has been amended. An explanation of the change(s) should be included with the updated return, as well as a copy of the federal amended return, Form 1040X, if one was filed.
  • The Louisiana Department of RevenueP.O. Box 3550Baton Rouge, La 70821-3550
  • Or mail an updated return that includes a payment to the following address: All other correspondence should be sent to the Louisiana Department of Revenue, P.O. Box 3440, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70821-3440.

In addition, you have the option of filing the updated return online using Louisiana File Online, which is a free web service provided by the Louisiana Department of Revenue. the top of the page

Mailing Addresses

The Taxpayer Service Center, which serves the majority of Connecticut taxpayers, allows them to file electronically (TSC). The TSC is a free, quick, simple, and secure alternative to traditional postal mail. In order to file paper returns, the following postal addresses must be utilized. Paper returns may be obtained from DRS and are included in the Connecticut income tax booklets. NOTE: If you are using a form that was created by a software program, the form may have a different postal address than the one listed on the form.

You will be helping to accelerate the processing of your return by doing so. To avoid confusion, make your check or money order payable to “Commissioner of Revenue Services.” Please provide the tax year as well as the name of the form in the message. (For example, CT-1040 for the year 2018)

If you are filing Form. and you are not making a payment: And you are making a payment:
CT-1040EXT Department of Revenue ServicesState of ConnecticutPO BOX2976 Hartford CT06104-2976 Department of Revenue Services State of ConnecticutPO BOX2977Hartford CT06104-2977
CT-1040 Department of Revenue ServicesState of ConnecticutPO BOX2976Hartford CT06104-2976 Department of Revenue ServicesState of ConnecticutPO BOX2977 Hartford CT 06104-2977
CT-1040NR/PY Department of Revenue ServicesPO Box2976 Hartford CT 06104-2976 Department of Revenue ServicesPO BOX2977 Hartford CT06104-2977
CT-1040ES N/A Department of Revenue ServicesPO Box2932 Hartford CT 06104-2932
CT-1040X Department of Revenue ServicesPO Box2935Hartford, CT 06104-2978 Department of Revenue Services PO Box2935Hartford, CT 06104-2978

Tax Season Information

AARP Tax Aide, offered by the AARP Foundation, provides FREE tax preparation for low- and moderate-income taxpayers, with a specific focus on those over the age of 50. AARP Tax Aide is funded by the AARP Foundation. The IRS has certified volunteer tax preparers who submit all of the tax returns online. Tax-Aide services are available to everyone, regardless of whether or not they are an AARP member. The locations in Manatee County will be available from February 1, 2022, until April 16, 2022.

To make an appointment online, please see the schedule shown below.

AARP Tax Aide Schedule

(Click on the link to the right to make an appointment at that particular location.) Appointments with a TaxAide at the Braden River Library, 4915 53rd Avenue E (SR70), Bradenton Wednesdays Fridays from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. Booking Appointments at the Manatee County Central Library, 1301 Barcarrota Blvd., in Bradenton. Tuesdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. (There will be no tax services on March 14, 2005) Thursdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Rocky Bluff Library TaxAide Appointments are available at 6750 US Highway 301 North in Ellenton.

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