Who Must File A Tax Return In 2016? (Solution)

What Are the Minimum Income Requirements to File a 2016 Federal Income Tax Return?

Filing Status Age Minimum W-2 Income Requirement
Single 65 or older $11,900
Head of Household Under 65 $13,350
65 or older $14,900
Married Filing Jointly Under 65 (both spouses) $20,700

Who is not required to file it return?

For FY 2020-21, total income up to Rs 2.5 lakh is not subject to tax for an individual. Such threshold income for a resident senior citizen (age of 60 years or more) and resident super senior citizens (age of 80 years or more) is Rs 3 lakh and Rs 5 lakh, respectively.

How much money do you have to make before you have to file a tax return?

Single. Not 65 or older: The minimum income amount needed for filing taxes in 2020 should be $12,400. 65 or older: It should be over $14,050 to file a tax return. If your unearned income was more than $1,050, you must file a return.

What age can you stop filing income taxes?

Updated for Tax Year 2019 You can stop filing income taxes at age 65 if: You are a senior that is not married and make less than $13,850. You are a senior that is married, and you are going to file jointly and make less than $27,000 combined.

Who is exempt from federal income tax?

For example, for the 2020 tax year (2021), if you’re single, under the age of 65, and your yearly income is less than $12,400, you’re exempt from paying taxes. Ditto if you’re married and filing jointly, with both spouses under 65, and income less than $24,800.

How do I file my taxes for last 3 years?

Procedure to file Income Tax Return (ITR) for previous years Income tax return for previous years can be filed through offline and online mode. For offline mode, you have to visit the office of income tax department of your city and have to manually fill income tax return form.

Is it mandatory to file income tax return for salaried employee?

You should know that such a filing is necessary only when your taxable income falls above the exemption limit. As of 2021, this exemption limit, as per the old as well as new tax regime, is ₹2,50,000. So, if you earn more than ₹2,50,000 of taxable income, it is mandatory to file ITR before the due date.

Do I need to file a tax return if my income is low?

The minimum income amount depends on your filing status and age. In 2021, for example, the minimum for single filing status if under age 65 is $12,550. If your income is below that threshold, you generally do not need to file a federal tax return.

Who are not required to file income tax return in the Philippines?

Who is exempt from filing income taxes? A minimum wage earner, Someone whose gross income (total earned for the past year) does not exceed your total personal and additional exemptions, Someone whose income derived from a single employer does not exceed P60,000 and the income tax on which has been correctly withheld.

Does Social Security count as income?

Since 1935, the U.S. Social Security Administration has provided benefits to retired or disabled individuals and their family members. While Social Security benefits are not counted as part of gross income, they are included in combined income, which the IRS uses to determine if benefits are taxable.

Do I have to file taxes if I made less than $5000?

If your gross income is less than the amount shown below, you’re off the hook! You are not required to file a tax return with the IRS. But remember, if Federal taxes were withheld from your earnings, you’ll want to file a tax return to get any withholdings back.

How much money do you need to make to file taxes 2017?

Here are some basic guidelines: For single dependents who are under the age of 65 and not blind, you generally must file a federal income tax return if your unearned income (such as from dividends or interest) was more than $1,050 or if your earned income (such as from wages or salary) was more than $6,300.

Do You Need To File A Tax Return In 2016?

The 2016 tax filing season has begun with the start of tax season. In 2016, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) intends to complete about 150 million individual tax returns, an increase from the previous year. Will you be submitting one of those tax returns, as well? And, maybe more importantly, do you really need to? Your 2015 income will be reported for the 2016 tax filing season, and you will record the income you got in 2014. This includes any compensation you received in 2015, but does not include any compensation you get in 2016 for services done in 2015 (you will record such income the following year).

You may or may not be required to submit a tax return depending on a number of circumstances, including how much you earned – and the source of that income – as well as your filing status and your age.

Choose your filing status, your age, and your gross income for the year from the drop-down menus in the chart below.

In the event that you are not claimed by anybody else on their federal income tax return, these restrictions will apply.

You may get the 2015 figures by clicking here.

Depending on whether or not you may be claimed as a dependant on someone else’s tax return, the laws are a little more complicated.

  • Individuals with single dependents who are under the age of 65 and are not blind normally are required to file a federal income tax return if their unearned income (such as dividends or interest) exceeds $1,050 or if their earned income (such as wages or pay) exceeds $6,300. Generally speaking, if you have a single dependant who is above the age of 65 or blind, you must file a federal income tax return if your unearned income exceeded $2,600 or your earned income exceeded $7,850. The IRS normally requires you to file a federal income tax return if you have a single dependant who is over 65 and blind, and if your unearned income was more than $4,150 or your earned income was more than $9,400. When you have married dependents and either of you is under the age of 65 and not blind, you generally must file a federal income tax return if your unearned income was more than $1,050, your earned income was more than $6,300, or if your gross income was at least $5 and your spouse files a separate return and itemizes deductions
  • If you have married dependents and either of you is under the age of 65 and not blind, you generally must file a federal income tax return if your You generally must file a federal income tax return if you have a married dependent who is over the age of 65 or blind, and your unearned income was more than $2,300, your earned income was more than $7,550, your gross income was at least $5, and your spouse files a separate return and itemizes deductions. While married with dependent children, if either of you is over 65 and blind, you are generally required to file an income tax return if your unearned income was more than $3,550
  • Your earned income was more than $8,800
  • Your gross income was at least $5
  • And your spouse files a separate income tax return with itemized deductions
  • Or both of you are over 65 and blind.

It’s important to remember that these regulations apply to dependents who are also married, not just married taxpayers in general. According to tax law, your spouse is never deemed a dependant on your income. You may also be required to submit for a variety of other reasons. One of the most common reasons for submitting a federal income tax return even when you don’t satisfy the basic income requirements is for self-employed individuals. Self-employed individuals who make at least $400 in net earnings must file a federal income tax return.

  • And, of course, if you, your spouse, or a dependant who registered in coverage via the Health Insurance Marketplace received advance payments of the premium tax credit, you may be required to submit a tax return.
  • If you received distributions from your HSA, Archer MSA, or Medicare Advantage MSA during the year 2015, you must file a tax return.
  • If you did not get your minimum needed distribution – and you were obligated to do so – you will also be required to file a tax return.
  • You may also be eligible for a refund for over-withholdings or a refundable credit, such as the earned income tax credit, if you have a low income (EITC).

And, of course, the Affordable Care Act adds a layer of complexity to the situation. What you need to know about filing and health care is summarized here in a few sentences.

  • It is presumed that you are exempt from the shared responsibility payment in 2015 if you are not obliged to submit a tax return in that year, and you are not needed to file a tax return in order to claim the coverage exemption. If you are obliged to submit a 2015 tax return and you did not have minimal health insurance coverage for the whole year, you will also be needed to file an extra form, which is referred to as a health insurance coverage waiver (form 8965). Form 8965 will be used to request an exemption from the shared responsibility payment or to calculate the amount of the payment you will be required to make. (For further information about exemptions, please see this page.)
  • It is necessary to submit a tax return in 2016 in order to reconcile the advance payments you got in 2015. This is true even if you are entitled to tax breaks. The failure to report the premium tax credit on a federal tax return in 2015, even if you received advance payments, may result in your inability to obtain more advance payments in the future. What this means is that if you obtained health care tax credits or subsidies and wish to continue receiving those health care tax credits or subsidies, you are still obligated to submit your federal income tax returns, even if you would otherwise be excluded from doing so. If you fail to file, you will be liable for the full cost of your health care insurance, and you may be required to reimburse part or all of the premium tax credit advance payments made in 2015.

(More on health-care requirements will be provided later in the season.) It’s also vital to remember that these are federal rules, not state rules. It’s possible that the rules in your state are substantially different. For example, in my home state of Pennsylvania, there is no personal exemption, and as a result, people are liable to tax from the very first dollar they earn. Do not make the mistake of assuming that you will not be required to submit a state (or local) income tax return even if you are exempt from federal income tax; instead, be cautious.

Five Tips on Whether to File a 2016 Tax Return

(More information on health-care standards will be provided later in the year.) Remember that these are federal regulations, which should be taken into consideration. There may be significant differences between the rules in your state. We do not have a personal exemption in my home state of Pennsylvania, and as a result, individuals are subject to tax from the very beginning of their income. Do not make the mistake of assuming that you will not be required to submit a state (or local) income tax return just because you are exempt from federal income tax.

  1. General Filing Requirements Income, filing status, and age are the most common factors that determine whether or not a taxpayer is required to submit a tax return. If the taxpayer is self-employed or is a dependency of another person, additional restrictions may apply to him or her. An individual who is unmarried and under the age of 65 must file if their income was at least $10,350 in the tax year in question. There are a variety of different situations in which a taxpayer is required to submit. More information can be found at IRS.gov/filing. Tax withheld or paid by the recipient. Is it true that the taxpayer’s employer withheld federal income tax from their paycheck? Is it true that the taxpayer made quarterly estimated tax payments? Is it possible that they overpaid last year and that the excess has been allocated to this year’s tax? If the answer to any of these questions is “yes,” the customer may be entitled to a refund. They must submit a tax return in order to qualify for the Earned Income Tax Credit. A taxpayer who worked and earned less than $53,505 in taxable income last year may be eligible to receive the EITC in the form of a tax refund. They must qualify, and they may do so with or without a qualified kid. They must qualify before applying. They may be eligible for up to $6,269 in financial assistance. To learn out, go to IRS.gov and use the 2016EITC Assistant tool. Taxpayers who wish to claim the EITC (Additional Child Tax Credit) must file a tax return with the IRS. Have you checked to see if the taxpayer has at least one child who qualifies for the Child Tax Credit. It is possible that they will be eligible for the Additional Child Tax Credit if they do not qualify for the full credit amount. Beginning in January 2017, the IRS is required by law to hold refunds for any tax return that claims either the Earned Income Tax Credit or the Additional Child Tax Credit until February 15, 2017. This refers to the whole refund, not only the portion connected to each credit
  2. American Opportunity Tax Credit
  3. And other credits. To be eligible for the AOTC, the taxpayer, their spouse, or a dependent must have been enrolled at least half-time in school for at least one academic period during the previous calendar year. It is possible to receive credit for up to four years of post-secondary study. For qualified students, the award might be valued up to $2,500. Even if the taxpayer does not owe any taxes, they may still be eligible for this program. Form 8863, Education Credits, should be completed and submitted with the tax return. More information may be found on the Education Creditsweb page.
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Instructions for completing Forms 1040, 1040-A, and 1040-EZ income tax filing requirements are provided. Taxpayers can also use the Interactive Tax Assistant feature on IRS.gov, which is available for free. They should seek under general topics for the question “Do I have to submit a return?” Many tax problems may be answered by using the program, which is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Every taxpayer should preserve a copy of their tax return for their records. For the first time in 2017, taxpayers who are utilizing a software program for the first time may be required to provide their Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) from their prior-year tax return in order to validate their identification.

Additional IRS Resources:

  • Schedule 8812 (Form 1040-A or 1040), Child Tax Credit
  • Publication 972, Child Tax Credit
  • Schedule 8812 (Form 1040-A or 1040), Child Tax Credit

IRS YouTube Videos:

  • Do I Need To File A Tax Return – English | Spanish | ASL (Obsolete)
  • Education Tax Credits – English | Spanish | ASL (Obsolete)
  • Do I Need To File A Tax Return – English | Spanish | ASL (Obsolete)
  • Do I

Subscribe to IRS Tax Tips for more information.

Filing Requirements

Your tax filing obligations are often determined by three factors:

Filing status

There are five filing statuses to choose from:

  • Single
  • Married filing jointly
  • Married filing separately
  • Widow(er) who qualifies
  • Head of household who qualifies

To understand more about each filing status, and to obtain extra tax filing information, continue reading this article.

Single

If both of the following conditions are met on the final day of the year, you fulfill the filing requirements for single status:

  • You are not married or have been legally separated from your spouse as a result of a divorce or a separate maintenance order
  • And As a head of household or qualifying widow(er), you are ineligible to submit a tax return.

It’s possible that you’ll be single if you were widowed before January 1, 2021, and you didn’t remarry by the end of the year. However, if you qualify to file as one of the following, you may be able to minimize your tax liability:

  • It’s possible that you’ll be single if you were widowed before January 1, 2021, and you didn’t remarry by the end of that year. But if you qualify to file as one of the following, you may be eligible to decrease your tax:

If you fulfill the requirements for filing a single status tax return and you are under the age of 65, you must file if your federal gross income was $12,550 or more.

If you are 65 or older and your federal gross income was $14,250 or more, you must submit a tax return.

Married filing jointly

If both of the following conditions were met on the final day of the year, you are deemed married:

  • None of you is legally separated from the other due to a divorce or separate maintenance decision
  • Neither of you is legally separated from the other.

None of you is legally separated from the other due to a divorce or separate maintenance order; neither of you is legally divorced from the other.

  • Together with your new spouse, file a combined tax return or separate tax returns
  • In the case of your deceased spouse, file a married filing separately return.

Married filing separately

A married pair has the option of filing either a joint or separate tax return. A combined return, on the other hand, frequently results in a smaller federal tax bill. If you file separate tax returns, the tax rates are often greater than if you file jointly. In addition, the IRS has restrictions on the deductions and credits you can claim if you file separately.

Qualifying widow(er)

If all of the following apply to you, you fulfill the filing requirements for the qualified widow(er) filing status:

  • You were eligible to submit a combined tax return for the year in which your spouse passed away. It makes no difference whether or not you actually filed a combined return if your spouse died in either of the two tax years immediately before the current tax year and you haven’t remarried since. As a result, in order to qualify for 2021, your spouse must have died in either 2019 or 2020. In addition to foster children, you can claim one of the following relatives as a dependant on your tax return:
  • In the course of the year, you paid more than half the expense of keeping your house. During the whole year, this must have been the primary residence of your kid or stepchild.

Head of household

The following conditions must be met in order to qualify for head of household filing status:

  • You were single or deemed unmarried on the final day of the year
  • You paid more than half the cost of keeping your house for the whole year
  • You paid more than half the cost of maintaining your home for the entire year
  • In the previous year, barring temporary absences, a qualified individual resided in your home with you for more than half of the calendar year. In contrast, if the qualified individual is your dependent parent, they are not required to reside with you.

More information may be found in Publication 17: Your Federal Income Tax.

Married but considered unmarried for tax purposes

All of the following conditions must be met in order to be declared unmarried for tax filing purposes:

  • Separate tax returns are filed by you and your spouse. You covered more than half of the costs of keeping your house for the full year
  • You were really kind. One of these persons lived in your house for more than half of the year since it was their primary residence:
  • A son or a stepson Child in foster care
  • A daughter or stepdaughter
  • A son or a stepson. Child in foster care
  • Daughter or stepdaughter

Let’s say you’re the following:

  • You have been living separately from your spouse since February 3, 2021. Not having a divorce decree or a formal separation agreement
  • Not wanting to submit a combined tax return
  • And other reasons. Possess a single kid

According to tax law, if you paid more than half of the costs of keeping the residence where you and your kid resided during the year, you are deemed unmarried. In this situation, you have the right to file as the head of household. If you file as head of household, you may be able to claim credits and deductions that are not available to married couples who file jointly and separately. These are some examples:

  • Student loan interest deduction
  • Earned Income Credit (EIC)
  • Child and Dependent Care Credit
  • Education Credits

More information may be found in Publication 501: Exemptions, Standard Deduction, and Filing Information, which is available online.

2021 tax filing requirements for most people

If you have a particular level of gross income in 2021, you are obligated to file a tax return for that year. The following are the minimum gross income criteria for each filing status:

  • The amount is $25,100 if both spouses are under the age of 65, $26,450 if one spouse is under the age of 65 and the other is 65 or older, and $27,800 for if both couples are over the age of 65.
  • The amount is $25,100 if both couples are under the age of 65, $26,450 if one spouse is under the age of 65 and the other is 65 or older, and $27,800 for a couple who is both above the age of 65.

2020 tax filing requirements for children and other dependents

If your parent or someone else has the authority to claim you as a dependant, the filing requirements will be determined by the following factors: If you are any of the following, you must file a tax return:

  • A tax return is required if you are one of the following categories of taxpayer:
  • There was more than $1,100 in unearned revenue in your account. Over $12,400 in earned revenue was earned by you. Your gross income exceeded the greater of the following:
  • There was more than $1,100 in unearned income in your case. Over $12,400 in earned revenue was earned by you
  • Your gross income exceeded the greater of the following two figures:
  • There was more than $2,750 in unearned income in your account. More than $14,050 was earned by you during the year. Your gross income exceeded the greater of the following:
  • $2,750
  • Your earned income up to $12,050 + $2,000
  • And any more funds.
  • If you have a single dependant who is 65 or older, blind, or if any of the following apply:
  • Your unearned income was in excess of $4,400 dollars. More than $15,700 was earned by you during the year. Your gross income exceeded the greater of the following:
  • $4,400
  • Your earned income up to $12,050 + $3,650
  • And your expenses.

Additional tax filing information

If any of the following circumstances exist for 2021, you must file:

  • You owe any special taxes, which may include any of the following:
  • Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT): An additional tax on a qualifying plan, such as an IRA or other tax-favored account, in addition to the regular tax. If, on the other hand, you’re just filing because you owe this tax, you can instead file Form 5329, which is the Household Employment Tax, on its own. The Schedule H can be filed by itself, if the reason for filing is just to collect the tax due
  • Social Security and Medicare tax on either of the following:
  • Your employer was not made aware of any tips you provided. Paychecks that you got from an employer who did not deduct these taxes from your paychecks
  • Recuperation of the first-time homebuyer’s tax credit Uncollected Social Security, Medicare, or railroad retirement taxes on these items are considered write-in taxes.
  • Tips that were reported to your company
  • Group term life insurance
  • And additional taxes on health savings accounts are all possibilities. More information may be found in the instructions for Line 62.
  • It is possible that you (or your spouse, if filing jointly) received distributions from a health savings account (HSA), an Archer Medical Savings Account (MSA), or a Medicare Advantage MSA. A minimum of $400 in net profits from self-employment was earned by you. Wages from a church or qualifying church-controlled organization that are free from Social Security and Medicare taxes totaled at least $108.28 each week
  • If you, your spouse, or a dependent registered in health coverage through the marketplace, you or your spouse may have received advance payments of the premium tax credit. If you (or your enroller) were eligible for the advance payments, you should have gotten Form 1095-A, which shows the amount of the installments.

It is possible that you (or your spouse, if you are filing jointly) received distributions from a health savings account (HSA), Archer Medical Savings Account (MSA), or a Medicare Advantage MSA. You had a minimum of $400 in net profits from self-employment. Wages from a church or qualifying church-controlled organization that are free from Social Security and Medicare taxes totaled at least $108.28 each week. If you, your spouse, or a dependent registered in health coverage through the marketplace, you or your spouse may have received advance payments from the premium tax credit.

Individual Income Tax – Louisiana Department of Revenue

  1. You (or your spouse, if you are filing jointly) received distributions from a health savings account (HSA), an Archer Medical Savings Account (MSA), or a Medicare Advantage MSA. You had a minimum of $400 in net profits from self-employment
  2. Wages from a church or qualifying church-controlled organization that are free from Social Security and Medicare taxes totaled at least $108.28
  3. You, your spouse, or a dependant who registered in coverage through a marketplace received an advance payment of the premium tax credit. If you (or your enroller) were eligible for the advance payments, you should have received Form 1095-A, which shows the amount of the advance payments.

Due Date of Returns and Payments

In the next year, returns and payments must be submitted on or by May 15th of that year.

Returns and payments for fiscal year taxpayers are due on the 15th day of the fifth month after the end of the fiscal year in which they were filed.

Determination of Tax

The tax is calculated by referring to tax tables provided by the Louisiana Department of Revenue (LDOR). Based on the taxpayer’s filing status as well as the taxpayer’s Louisiana taxable income, a graded scale is employed to determine the tax rate. Tax rates have changed recently, and the following changes are reflected in the figures:

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Rate of tax
Effective January 1, 2009 Effective January 1, 2022
Single, married filing separately, or head of household:
First $12,500 2 percent 1.85 percent
Next $37,500 4 percent 3.50 percent
Over $50,000 6 percent 4.25 percent
Married filing jointly or qualified surviving spouse:
First $25,000 2 percent 1.85 percent
Next $75,000 4 percent 3.50 percent
Over $100,000 6 percent 4.25 percent

Requesting an Extension of Time for Filing a Return

In accordance with Revised Statute 47:103, an extension of time to file an individual income tax return of up to six months may be allowed upon request. The request for an extension must be submitted before the state tax filing deadline, which is May 15th for calendar year filers and the 15th day of the fifth month after the completion of a fiscal year for those who file on a quarterly basis. The following are the five possibilities available for obtaining an extension:

  1. Filing an extension request electronically through the Louisiana Department of Revenue’s Individual Income Online Tax Filing application or the Online Extension Filing application
  2. Filing an extension request electronically through the Louisiana Department of Revenue’s Interactive Voice Response phone system by calling 225-922-3270 or 888-829-3071
  3. If you want to make an extension request, choose option3, then option 1. When requesting an extension, taxpayers will need to provide their social security number as well as the principal account holder. Making a state extension request through the Louisiana Department of Revenue by “checking the state extension box” included in the tax preparation software for an electronically-filed return
  4. Making a state paper extension request on Form R-2868, Application for Extension of Time to File Louisiana Individual Income Tax
  5. Or making a federal paper extension request (Form R-4868, Application for Automatic Extension of Time to File United States Individual Income Tax Return)

Tax preparers who are subject to the electronic filing obligation set out in LAC 61:III.1501 are required to submit all extension requests over the internet. To file numerous extension requests, tax preparers can use the bulk extension filing application, which is available on the IRS website. This program can be utilized by any company that has registered for an Electronic Filing Identification Number (EFIN) with the Louisiana Department of Revenue (LDR), as well as by any taxpayer who has a current Louisiana Account Number on file with the LDR.

The interest and late payment penalty will be applied to any payments received after the return due date has passed.

Resident Individual Income Tax

To comply with LAC 61:III.1501, all extension requests must be submitted electronically by tax preparers who are subject to the mandatory electronic filing obligation. To file many extension requests at the same time, tax preparers can use use the bulk extension filing program. If you are a company with an Electronic Filing Identification Number (EFIN) registered with the Louisiana Department of Revenue or a taxpayer with a current Louisiana Account Number listed with the Louisiana Department of Revenue, you may use this program to file your taxes electronically.

The interest and late payment penalty will be applied to any payments received after the return due date has reached.

Nonresident and Part-Year Resident Individual Income Tax

Nonresident and part-year resident taxpayers who are obliged to file a federal individual income tax return are also required to submit a Louisiana individual income tax return, IT-540B, on which they must record any income obtained from sources in Louisiana. It is necessary to record all income from all sources in order to calculate the ratio of Louisiana adjusted gross income to federal adjusted gross income for the purposes of the IT-540B computation. Only income derived from Louisiana sources, on the other hand, is subject to taxation.

Nonresidents who obtain gaming wins from Louisiana sources and who are obliged to submit a federal income tax return are also required to file a Louisiana income tax return, which reports the Louisiana income generated on the winnings.

Employees of the military whose domicile (house of record) is located outside of Louisiana are not obliged to submit a Louisiana income tax return on the salary they earn while serving in the armed forces.

In order to compute the amount of Louisiana tax payable based on the amount of their Louisiana taxable income, nonresident and part-year resident taxpayers must utilize the Tax Computation Worksheet, which is available online.

Each dependant, as well as each taxpayer and/or spouse over the age of 65 or who is blind, receives a $1,000 tax credit that is applied in assessing the amount of tax owed on his or her behalf. the top of the page

Nonresident Athlete Individual Income Tax

If a nonresident or part-year resident taxpayer is obliged to submit a federal individual income tax return, he or she must also file a Louisiana income tax return, IT-540B, on which they must record all income derived from sources in Louisiana. It is necessary to record all income from all sources in order to calculate the ratio of Louisiana adjusted gross income to federal adjusted gross income for the purpose of calculating the IT-540B tax deduction. Taxation is only applied to income derived from sources in Louisiana.

  1. Nonresidents who obtain gaming wins from Louisiana sources and who are obliged to submit a federal income tax return are also required to file a Louisiana income tax return, which reports the Louisiana income generated on such winnings.
  2. Employees of the military whose domicile (house of record) is located outside of Louisiana are not obliged to submit a Louisiana income tax return on the salaries they earn while serving in the army.
  3. In order to compute the amount of Louisiana tax payable based on the amount of their Louisiana taxable income, nonresident and part-year resident taxpayers utilize the Tax Computation Worksheet.
  4. Taxpayers and/or spouses over the age of 65 or who are blind receive a $1,000 credit for each dependant as well as for each taxpayer and/or spouse over the age of 65 or who is blind.
  • The Professional Golfers Association of America, also known as the PGA Tour, Inc., the National Football League, the National Basketball Association, the National Hockey League, the East Coast Hockey League, and the Pacific Coast League are among the organizations represented.

The National Football League, the National Basketball Association, the National Hockey League, the East Coast Hockey League, and the Pacific Coast League are among the organizations represented on the PGA Tour.

Declaration of Estimated Tax

According to Louisiana Revised Statute 47:116, taxpayers who expect their estimated Louisiana income tax after credits and taxes withheld to be more than $1,000 for single filers and $2,000 for joint filers must file a declaration of estimated income tax and make estimated tax payments to the Louisiana Department of Revenue. Residents should utilize the current year’s Income Tax Tables to estimate their income tax burden based on the anticipated amount of Louisiana taxable income in order to determine the projected tax.

In order to get general information on the calculation and payment of estimated tax, refer to the estimated payment instructions, Form IT-540ES (I).

Farmers and fishermen are entitled to special protections.

If a person files their individual income tax return before March 1st of the subsequent taxable year and pays the complete amount owed, Revised Statute 47:116(F) provides an exemption from the obligation to make estimated tax payments.

It is not possible to avoid the underpayment penalty if you failed to pay the estimated income tax that was due earlier in the year by filing a declaration, amended declaration, or paying the last installment on time by January 15th, or by filing an income tax return on time by January 31st, or by paying the last installment on time by January 31st.

Options for Estimated Tax Payments— Taxpayers have the option of paying the anticipated tax through one of the following methods:

  1. Electronically with the use of Louisiana File Online
  2. By credit card through the use of Official Payments
  3. Utilizing the Louisiana Estimated Tax Declaration Voucher for Individuals, FormIT-540ES, you can file your return by mail. Make checks payable to the Department of Revenue if you want to pay by check. Please do not send cash.

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Penalty For Failure to Pay or Underpayment of Estimated Tax

The failure to pay or underpayment of anticipated income tax, as provided in Revised Statute 47:118, is punishable by a penalty. The penalty is equal to 12 percent of the underpayment amount every year for the period during which the underpayment occurred. Making a determination on the amount of the underpayment

  1. If no return was filed, the underpayment is the difference between the installment amount that would have been required if the estimated tax had been 90 percent (66.66 percent for qualified farmers and fishermen) of the tax due for the previous taxable year or, if no return was filed, 90 percent (66.66 percent for qualified farmers and fishermen) of the tax due for the current year, and the installment amount that was paid on or before the last date prescribed for the payment. The needed installment amount is equal to 25 percent of the required yearly payment for the purpose of calculating the underpayment amount.

Definition of the Underpayment Period— The underpayment period runs from the day on which a payment was due to the date on which the payment was not received, whichever is earlier:

  1. Either the 15th day of the fourth month following the end of the taxable year
  2. Or, the date on which any portion of the underpayment is paid up to the amount of the payment

either the 15th day of the fourth month after the end of the taxable year; or, the date on which any portion of the underpayment is paid up to the amount of the payment

  1. What would have been required to be paid on or before the due date if the projected tax had been the lesser of either one of the following amounts:
  • If the individual submitted a tax return for the prior year and the year was a taxable year of 12 months, the tax owed on that year’s return is calculated as follows: either the tax that would have been due for the preceding taxable year based on the taxpayer’s status and personal exemptions and credits for dependents, as well as the facts shown on his return
  • Or, ninety percent (66.66 percent for qualified farmers and fishermen) of the tax due on an annualized basis for each quarterly period
  1. 90 percent of the tax computed at the appropriate rates on the basis of actual taxable income for the months in the taxable year ending before the month in which the installment is due

Ninety percent of the tax estimated at the appropriate rates on the basis of actual taxable income for the months in the taxable year ending before the month in which the installment is needed to be paid;

Filing an Amended Return

If you submit your Louisiana income tax return and subsequently discover that you need to make changes to your income, deductions, or credits, you must file an updated (corrected) Louisiana income tax return to reflect the changes. To file an updated return on paper, follow these steps:

  1. Use either Form IT-540, Resident Return, or Form IT-540B, Nonresident and Part-year Resident Return, depending on which form is appropriate for your situation. A distinct form for amending a return does not exist in Louisiana
  2. Instead, Make sure you are using the right form for the tax year you are making the change. Filing the revised return as though the original return had not been submitted is the correct procedure. Do not make any modifications for refunds that have already been received or payments that have already been paid. The return should be clearly marked with a “X” in the “Amended Return” field to indicate that it has been amended. An explanation of the change(s) should be included with the updated return, as well as a copy of the federal amended return, Form 1040X, if one was filed.
  • The Louisiana Department of RevenueP.O. Box 3550Baton Rouge, La 70821-3550
  • Or mail an updated return that includes a payment to the following address: All other correspondence should be sent to the Louisiana Department of Revenue, P.O. Box 3440, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70821-3440.

In addition, you have the option of filing the updated return online using Louisiana File Online, which is a free web service provided by the Louisiana Department of Revenue. the top of the page

Do I need to file a 2016 tax return? – TaxAct Blog

For the 2017 tax year, this document has been updated. It’s time to submit your taxes for the second time! Is that correct? Anyone who has earned any taxable income is not required to submit a federal income tax return every year. This includes those who have no taxable income. To evaluate whether or not you should submit a tax return for the 2017 tax year, ask yourself the following four questions.

Does my gross income meet the filing thresholds?

The requirement to submit a federal income tax return begins with your gross income, which is defined as the total amount of money you make before any tax deductions are taken into account. If your gross income is equal to or greater than a specified amount, you are required to file a tax return. You must first determine your filing status in order to determine what your income threshold is. Even though they did not earn the bare minimum amount of income required to file, certain taxpayers are compelled to submit a tax return in order to reconcile or disclose certain items on their return.

See also:  How To File Income Tax Return Online? (Question)

Special taxes.

  • A return is required if, for example, you are required to pay FICA tax on unreported tip money and you have not yet done so. Additional paperwork is required to submit household employment taxes or additional taxes on an IRA or other tax-favored account.

Distributions received from a tax-advantaged medical expense account.

  • Among the options are health savings accounts, medical savings accounts, andMedicare Advantage MSA dividends.

Self-employment income.

  • A self-employment tax return must be filed for any amount of net self-employment income (income after company expenditures) that exceeds $400. This is because you are obligated to pay income tax on that amount.

Did my child earn income?

It is possible that your kid, who is eligible to be listed as a dependant on your tax return and who has earned or unearned income, will be required to file a separate tax return. This is true even if you do not officially list him as a dependant on your tax return. You must submit a tax return for any dependents you have if any of the following conditions apply to their income in 2016:

  • It was more than $1,050 in unearned income (such as interest and dividends)
  • Earned income (such as wages)
  • Or gross income (which was more than the greater of $1,050 or total earned income (up to $6,300) plus $350.

Did I have any tax withheld from my pay?

It was more than $1,050 in unearned income (such as interest and dividends); earned income (such as wages); or gross income (which was more than the greater of $1,050 or total earned income (up to $6,300) plus $350;

More to explore:

  • Before you file your 2018 tax return, you should be aware of the following tax reform changes: Why the Qualified Business Income Deduction Can Have a Negative Impact on Your Tax Return How long do I need to keep my tax return on file? In my tax return, I can claim the following people as dependents:

Do I Need to File a Tax Return? IRS Income Thresholds to File Taxes

Every year, when I post the tax filing deadlines for the forthcoming tax season, I receive a number of questions concerning the income criteria for filing taxes. While there are other considerations (such as residency status and the ability to claim tax credits) that influence whether you are required to file taxes or not, your gross income is the key determinant. Gross income includes all money received from the sale of things, the rental of property, and the provision of services that are not excluded from taxation.

The table below displays the minimum gross income criteria for being required to submit a tax return, based on filing status and age, for each filing status and age group.

With TurboTax, you can get the most out of your refund and tax advantages.

Tax Year (Filing Year) Single Filers Married Filing Jointly Head of Household Married Filing Separately
2021 (2022) $12,400 ($14,050 if 65 or older) $24,800 (both spouses under 65)$26,150 (if one spouse65yrs)$27,400 (both spouses65yrs) $18,650($20,300 if 65 or older) $5 (any age)

It is important to note that your filing status is determined by your family’s condition on the last day of the tax year (Dec 31st). As a result, if you were married in the middle of the year, you would normally file in the married filing jointly status (rather than as a single filer in the preceding year) for the remainder of the year. You should also keep in mind that if you file your taxes under the married filing jointly status and you did not live with your spouse at the end of the year and your gross income was at least $5, you must submit a tax return regardless of your age.

  1. When evaluating whether or not you are required to file a tax return, you do not include tax-exempt income in your gross income calculation.
  2. All adults should submit a tax return, regardless of whether or not their income falls below the above-mentioned levels, according to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).
  3. Whenever in doubt, simply submit a tax return.
  4. The Internal Revenue Service’s Publication 17 is a complete overview of the requirements for filing taxes.

The IRS’ interactive tax assistant (IAT) can also aid you in determining whether or not filing is a wise financial decision for you. Subscribe through email or follow us on Facebook, Twitter, or YouTube to be the first to know about new and exciting developments.

2016 Business Income Tax Forms

Number Title Description
500 Maryland Corporation Income Tax Return Form used by a corporation and certain other organizations to file an income tax return for a specific tax year or period.
500CR-Instructions Business Income Tax Credits Instructions for form used to claim selected business tax credits against corporation or personal income tax. An electronic return must be submitted to claim a business tax credit on Form 500CR. The instructions are used as a reference to help a taxpayer prepare the business income tax credit section of an electronic return. (The paper version of Form 500CR is no longer available).
500D Declaration of Estimated Corporation Income Tax Form used by a corporation to declare and remit estimated income tax for tax year 2016.
500DM Decoupling Modification Form used to determine the amount of addition and subtraction modifications that are required as a result of Maryland’s decoupling from certain federal provisions listed on the form.
500E Application for an Extension to File Corporation Income Tax Return Form used to apply for an extension of time to file the corporation income tax return, and to remit any tax that may be due.
500UP Underpayment of Estimated Income Tax by Corporations and Pass-Through Entities Form and instructions used by corporations or pass-through entities to calculate the amount of interest and penalty for failure to pay the required amount of estimated income tax when due.
500X Amended Corporation Income Tax Return Form used by corporations to correct an error in a previously filed 2016 Form 500 or to claim a net operating loss (NOL) deduction.
502S Maryland Heritage Structure Rehabilitation Tax Credit 502S is used to calculate allowable tax credits for the rehabilitation of certified rehabilitation structures completed in tax year 2016. You must file your tax return electronically to claim a Heritage Structure Rehabilitation Tax Credit on a corporation or PTE return.

Your 2016 Federal Income Tax Return & Marketplace Health Coverage

IMPORTANT:The information on these pages will assist you in filing your 2016 tax returns.

  • The information on these pages will assist you in filing your 2016 federal and state income taxes.

You should have filed your 2016 taxes by now, but if you haven’t, you should do it as soon as you possibly can. When you submit your taxes for the 2016 tax filing year, make sure to include the following information:

  • When you submit your 2016 federal income tax return, you’ll be required to furnish extra information. It’s possible that you’ll have to fill out one or two new tax forms. It is possible that you may need to utilize a tax tool to locate 2016 Bronze or Silver premiums in order to finish your tax return. It’s possible that you’ll have to file a health coverage exemption or pay a charge with your tax return if you didn’t have health insurance in 2016.

Your 2016 health coverage status

To determine your next actions if you haven’t filed your 2016 taxes yet, choose the scenario that best describes your health condition in 2016 and apply it to your situation:

  • If you had a Marketplace plan with premium tax credits in 2016, you might save money. If you were enrolled in a 2016 Marketplace plan that did not qualify for premium tax credits
  • If you had employer-sponsored health insurance in 2016, If you have alternative health insurance coverage for the year 2016
  • If you didn’t have health insurance, you’d be in a lot of trouble.

Individual Income Tax – Resident and Nonresident

Individual Income Tax Forms – Resident and Nonresident

Form No. Name Instructions e-File Fillable Hand Writeable Prior Years
L-15 Substitute for HW-2 or W-2, Wage and Tax Statement Rev. 2018
L-72 Request for Copies of Hawaii Tax Return Rev. 2018
L-80 Tracer Request For Tax Year _ Rev. 2019
L-82 Refund Change Request for Tax Year _ 2021
N-2 Individual Housing Account Rev. 2018
N-11 Individual Income Tax Return (Resident Form)CAUTION:Fillable form generates a taxpayer specific 2D barcode. Please do not copy and reproduce for mass distribution. Rev. 2021 Rev. 2021 Rev. 2021 Prior
N-13 OBSOLETE Individual Income Tax Return. For 2016, use the N-11. Prior
N-15 Individual Income Tax Return (Nonresidents and Part-Year Residents) Rev. 2021 Rev. 2021 Rev. 2021 Prior
Sch. AMD Explanation of Changes on Amended Return Rev. 2018
Sch. CR Schedule of Tax Credits 2021 Rev. 2021 Rev. 2021 Prior
Sch. D1 Sales of Business Property Rev. 2021 Rev. 2021 Prior
Sch. J Supplemental Annuities Schedule Rev. 2021 Prior
Sch. X Tax Credits for Hawaii Residents Rev. 2021 Prior
HW-16 Dependent Care Provider’s Identification and Certification Rev. 2016
N-103 Sale of Your Home Rev. 2021 Rev. 2021 Prior
N-109 Application for Tentative Refund from Carryback of Net Operating Loss (Other Than Corporation) Rev. 2021
N-110 Statement of Person Claiming Refund Due a Deceased Taxpayer Rev. 2018
N-139 Moving Expenses with Instructions Rev. 2021
N-152 Tax on Lump-Sum Distributions Rev. 2021 Rev. 2021 Prior
N-158 Investment Interest Expense Deduction Rev. 2021 Prior
N-163 Fuel Tax Credit for Commercial Fishers – Individual Rev. 2020
N-168 Income Averaging for Farmers and Fisherman Rev. 2021 Rev. 2021 Prior
N-172 Claim for Tax Exemption by Person with Impaired Sight or Hearing or by Totally Disabled Person and Physician’s Certification Rev. 2020 Rev. 2020
N-188X OBSOLETE – Amended Individual Income Tax Return (Rev. 2008). Use the tax return for the year you are amending AND attach Schedule AMD.
N-196 Annual Summary and Transmittal of Hawaii Annual Information Returns Rev. 2020
N-200V Individual Income Tax Payment Voucher Rev. 2019 Rev. 2019 Prior
N-210 Underpayment of Estimated Tax by Individuals, Estates and Trusts Rev. 2021 Rev. 2021 Prior
N-289 Certification for Exemption from the Withholding Tax on the Disposition of Hawaii Real Property Interests Rev. 2019
N-311 Refundable Food/Excise Tax Credit Rev. 2021
N-312 Capital Goods Excise Tax Credit Rev. 2021 Rev. 2020
N-323 Carryover of Tax Credit Rev. 2021 Rev. 2021
N-330 School Repair and Maintenance Tax Credit Rev. 2021 Rev. 2020
N-338 Recapture of the Tax Credit for Flood Victims Rev. 2018
N-340 Motion Picture, Digital Media, and Film Production Tax Credit Rev. 2020 Rev. 2020
N-342 Renewable Energy Technologies Income Tax Credit for Systems Placed in Service on or after July 1, 2009 Rev. 2021 Rev. 2020
N-342A Information Statement Concerning Renewable Energy Technologies Income Tax Credit For Systems Installed and Place In Service On Or After July 1, 2009 Rev. 2020
N-342B Composite Schedule For Form N-342A Rev. 2017 Rev. 2020
N-342C Composite Schedule For Form N-342 Rev. 2017 Rev. 2020
N-344 Important Agricultural Land Qualified Agricultural Cost Tax Credit Rev. 2021 Rev. 2020
N-348 Capital Infrastructure Tax Credit Rev. 2021
N-352 Renewable Fuels Production Tax Credit Rev. 2021 Rev. 2020
N-354 Organic Foods Production Tax Credit Rev. 2021 Rev. 2021
N-356 Earned Income Tax Credit Rev. 2021
N-379 Request for Innocent Spouse Relief Rev. 2012 Rev. 2018
N-586 Tax Credit for Low-Income Housing Rev. 2021 Rev. 2021
N-615 Computation of Tax for Children Under Age 14 Who Have Investment Income of More than $1,000 Rev. 2021 Rev. 2021 Prior
N-756 Enterprise Zone Tax Credit Rev. 2017 Rev. 2020
N-814 Parent’s Election to Report Child’s Interest and Dividends Rev. 2021 Prior
N-848 Power of Attorney BeginningJuly 1, 2017, the Department will require any person who represents a taxpayer in a professional capacity to register as a “verified practitioner.” Any person who is not required to register as a “verified practitioner” must use their full social security number on Form N-848 or register for a “tax matter representative” identification number. The Department will not accept prior versions of Form N-848 after June 30, 2017. Please seeTax Announcement 2017-03for more details. Rev. 2020 Rev. 2018
N-884 Credit for Employment of Vocational Rehabilitation Referrals Rev. 2020

Users should be aware of the following: Is there a form that you want to search up by its number? Please check ourHawaii Tax Forms for further information (Alphabetical Listing). Forms and instructions from the Department of Taxation, as well as a large number of pamphlets, bulletins, and reports, are all available as pdf files. Adobe Reader is required in order to view and print forms and instruction manuals. By clicking on the “Get Adobe Reader” button, you may get a free copy of the Reader.

Please have a look at the System Requirements before continuing.

In order to protect your personal information, a “Clear Form” option has been added to all currently active writable forms.

Tip: If you are having difficulties viewing any of the forms on the internet, right-click on the link and select “Save target as.” to save the file to your computer’s hard disk.

Page The most recent update was made on January 3, 2022.

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