Why Is My Tax Return Delayed?

Your refund may be delayed if you made math errors or if you forgot to sign your return or include your Social Security number. It may also be delayed if your dependents’ information doesn’t match IRS records, or if you left out a corresponding schedule or form to support a deduction or credit, says Pickering.

Why is my tax refund taking so long?

  • You made an error on your return
  • You are claiming the earned income tax credit (EITC) or additional child tax credit.
  • Your return is affected by fraud or identity theft
  • You filed a paper tax return

Is there a delay in tax refunds for 2020?

In 2020, the IRS postponed the filing deadline for tax year 2019 tax returns from April 15 to July 15 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Taxpayers who filed their returns on July 15, 2020, may reasonably believe they have until July 15, 2023, to obtain full refunds.

Why is my 2020 tax refund taking so long?

What’s Taking So Long? If you don’t receive your refund in 21 days, your tax return might need further review. This may happen if your return was incomplete or incorrect. The IRS may send you instructions through the mail if it needs additional information in order to process your return.

Why is my tax refund still delayed?

Tens of millions of taxpayers experienced prolonged delays in the processing of their returns last year, as the IRS continued to work through challenges exacerbated by the Covid-19 pandemic, like staffing shortages and tax law changes.

Are 2021 tax refunds delayed?

That means 2021 tax refunds are likely to be delayed; usually electronic refunds come three weeks after filing, a week faster than ones for paper returns. Based on last year’s experience, getting answers from the IRS will be even harder than usual, too. 1

Why is my CRA refund taking so long?

The CRA may take longer to process your return if it is selected for a more detailed review. See Review of your tax return by the CRA for more information. If you use direct deposit, you could get your refund faster. Set up direct deposit.

How long can the IRS hold your refund for Review 2020?

How long can IRS legally hold refund? There is no statutory limit. However, after 45 days from the filing deadline they must pay interest on the refund, and after six months you can sue them in the Court of Claims.

How long does your refund stay in processing?

When to expect your IRS refund About 90% of electronically filed tax returns are processed within 21 days. Paper returns are processed six to eight weeks after they arrive at the IRS. If you electronically file and provide bank account information to the IRS for direct deposit, you’ll see your refund the quickest.

Why is my tax return still processing after 5 months?

One reason for this is because the IRS may still be making changes to their processes. That could include updated security measures or process tweaks due to changes in the tax code. And if the IRS needs to update or make changes, it probably won’t make them until just before tax time.

Why have I not received my 2020 refund?

If you haven’t received your tax refund after at least 21 days of filing online or six weeks of mailing your paper return, go to a local IRS office or call the federal agency (check out our list of IRS phone numbers that could get you help faster). 2

Can I sue the IRS for holding my refund?

Generally, if you fully paid the tax and the IRS denies your tax refund claim, or if the IRS takes no action on the claim within six months, then you may file a refund suit. You can file a suit in a United States District Court or the United States Court of Federal Claims.

Can I call the IRS about my refund?

Call us at 800-829-1954 (toll-free) and either use the automated system or speak with a representative.

Why is my tax refund still being processed after 21 days?

The IRS will issue most refunds in less than 21 calendar days. This could mean that all of the necessary forms were not sent to the IRS for processing. Your return has been flagged for identity theft or fraud.

When can I expect my 2021 tax refund?

Most taxpayers will receive their refund within 21 days of when they file electronically if they choose direct deposit and there are no issues with their tax return, according to the IRS. Some tax filers are still complaining that they did not receive their refund yet from federal returns filed last year.

Why is My Tax Refund Delayed?

For the vast majority of people, their tax refund will be the most important money they get throughout the year – and they will rely on it. The Internal Revenue Service understands how important your refund is to you. It takes pleasure in paying out the majority of refunds within 21 days of receiving the request. What happens, though, if your tax refund is delayed? ” Where has my refund gone?” is a question we are asked a lot here at H R Block. In addition, this essay will explain why you may be receiving a delayed tax refund.

  • Sought a Recovery Rebate Credit, but the amount you claimed does not match the amount of credit that the IRS determines you are entitled to
  • The use of the lookback rule in order to utilize your prior-year earned income in order to compute your Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) or your Additional Child Tax Credit

If your return fits these requirements, the Internal Revenue Service will personally analyze it, and it may take an additional 90 to 120 days before you get your tax refund. The Internal Revenue Service recommends that you continue to visit theWhere’s My Refundsite for any changes. Additional information is available on the Internal Revenue Service’s website. The IRS and the United States Congress are concerned about the speed with which refunds are issued. When the IRS sends refunds rapidly, there isn’t always enough time to double-check that the returns are correct.

EITC/ACTC Tax Refunds Delayed Until Late February

That’s why, beginning with the 2017 tax season, Congress provided the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) greater powers to scrutinize returns. To be more specific, Congress:

  • The deadline for employers to return Forms W-2, which reflect taxpayers’ salary and the amount of income tax withholding they paid, as well as Forms 1099, which disclose payments made to independent contractors, has been extended. Late refunds including the earned income credit (EIC) and/or the supplementary child tax credit must be received before the deadline of January 31. (ACTC). It is possible that the IRS will not be able to distribute these refunds before February 15, but the IRS has stated that you should receive your return by the first week of March.

With the implementation of both new standards, the Internal Revenue Service will have the information and time it requires to investigate more returns before providing refunds for the first time. The IRS, on the other hand, is not new to the practice of scrutinizing and delaying returns. In reality, various IRS compliance programs deduct or delay refunds for millions of taxpayers each year as a result of noncompliance with the law. Some of the reasons why your tax refund may be delayed include the following:

Reason1 – IRS Taking Your Refund

When the Internal Revenue Service issues refunds, it mostly takes or decreases (offsets) payments when taxpayers owe money to the government. The following are the two most prevalent scenarios:

You owe federal taxes, and you haven’t paid:

If the Internal Revenue Service uses your refund to pay back federal taxes you owe, you’ll find out about it a few weeks after you complete your tax return. You’ll receive IRS notice CP49, Overpayment Applied to Taxes Owed, informing you of this. For those who disagree with the IRS’s assessment of their debt, their sole recourse is to file an updated return to remedy the error or fight any additional taxes the IRS has assessed against them in error (like a tax bill from anauditor anunderreporting notice).

You owe other debts, and you haven’t paid:

In accordance with the Treasury Offset Program (TOP), the IRS may deduct or decrease your refund if you owe other forms of obligations, including non-tax debts, such as those listed below.

  • Child support that is past due
  • Payments to other federal agencies
  • State taxes
  • And unemployment compensation repayments

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) is unable to address questions or resolve disputes about TOP debts. Taxpayers who have questions may contact TOP at (800) 304-3107. Spouses who are not responsible for the accident might get a portion of the reimbursement.

If you filed jointly with your spouse and the IRS withdrew your whole refund to pay for your spouse’s debts, you may be able to recover your half of the refund if you file separately. Fill out Form 8379, Injured Spouse Allocation, to file a claim on behalf of your injured spouse.

Reason2 – IRS Holding Your Refund

In a variety of circumstances, the IRS may withhold your refund and require further information from you. This does not necessarily imply that you are being audited, but it may indicate that you are if you do not respond with all of the required information before the deadline. The following are six of the most prevalent instances in which the IRS might place a hold on your tax return:

You mailed in your return, and the IRS flagged a “math error”:

When taxpayers submit their returns electronically, the e-file procedure detects and rejects many of the mistakes that they make on their returns at the time of filing. If you mail your return instead of e-filing it, the Internal Revenue Service is more likely to discover an error after the fact, according to the IRS. The Internal Revenue Service refers to most of these blunders as “math errors,” although they are not confined to arithmetic errors. If your Social Security Number (SSN) or the information about your dependents does not match the information on file with the IRS, the IRS may be able to modify any relevant deductions or credits (like the deduction for your dependent, the EITC or the child and dependent care credit).

If the IRS makes a modification to your return, you’ll get a letter (often IRS notice CP21) informing you of the change and requiring you to fix the problem within 60 days.

You would then need to revise your tax return and follow up with the IRS in order to receive your refund at that time.

The IRS suspects identity theft:

Identity theft filters used by the IRS can cause tax returns and tax refunds to be delayed until people prove their identities. If this occurs, you will often get IRS Letter 5071, in which you will be asked to authenticate your identification. If you want to verify your identity until the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) reinstates its online identity verification process, you can do so by providing the IRS Taxpayer Protection Program unit with information from your previous year’s return, your current-year return, as well as your current-year Forms W-2 and 1099.

The IRS is challenging tax credit(s) you claimed:

It is possible that the IRS will delay your refund and ask for additional information if it determines that you are not eligible to claim any of the following credits: Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), American Opportunity Tax Credit (ACTC), advanced payments of the premium tax credit, or American Opportunity Tax Credit. Technically, this is a tax-related audit by the IRS. If the Internal Revenue Service contests your EITC claim, you’ll often get Letter CP75, in which the IRS will request documentation that you qualify for the EITC.

Discover how to deal with an IRS audit.

The IRS identified potential ACA health insurance issues:

It has only been a few years since the implementation of the Affordable Care Act’s requirement that taxpayers obtain health insurance coverage, as well as the launch of the health insurance marketplaces, through which taxpayers can purchase insurance and receive tax credits to help them afford premiums. From 2017 forward, the Internal Revenue Service began collecting millions of information statements pertaining to taxpayers’ health insurance coverage (Forms 1095-A, 10-B, and 10-C), as well as information about any tax credits they may have been eligible to receive.

If your return contains discrepancies or omits a reconciliation of the advance payments of the premium tax credit, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) may contact you for additional information to process your return (Letter 12C), or it may initiate an audit to assess penalties for failing to maintain the minimum required insurance coverage.

You need to file an old return:

When the Internal Revenue Service pursues previous tax returns, the IRS has the authority to hold any refunds you may be entitled until the old return is filed. The only method to resolve this situation and receive your refund is to file the overdue tax return. If you owe taxes on an old return, the Internal Revenue Service will deduct that amount from your current-year refund.Learn more about how to deal with past tax returns.

You’re under audit from an earlier year:

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has the authority to hold your tax refund until any audits are completed. A postal audit of your EITCor ACTC return from a previous year is the most prevalent instance of this occurring. The IRS will often send you Letter CP88, which states that your refund has been held until the IRS has completed the audit. If you provide the IRS with the needed information by the deadline, the IRS will normally complete the audit within six months and will be able to process your refund request.

Handling a Refund Delay – Do Your Research and Respond Right Away

If the IRS is delaying your return, you’ll need to figure out why and maneuver your way through the IRS so that your refund is sent as fast as you can. This might be a difficult undertaking because refund holds can appear to be audits in nature. But, please, be patient and do not be concerned. In the event that your tax return is valid, all that is required is that you explain everything to the IRS (and, if necessary, provide documents). The best course of action is to explore the reason for your refund hold as soon as you receive a notice from the IRS.

Contact the IRS andresearch your IRS account.

When you have a better understanding of why the IRS delayed your tax refund and how to reply to the IRS, you should take action immediately to avoid more complications.

Your H R Block tax professional may also assist you in determining the cause of a refund delay and can speak with the Internal Revenue Service on your behalf. Learn more about H R Block’s Tax AuditTax Notice Services by visiting their website.

Tax Refund Delay: What to Do and Who to Contact

It is possible that your tax refund will be delayed for a variety of reasons. It’s possible that your figures and those of your employer didn’t match. Alternatively, you may have mistakenly missed a line—or perhaps an entire form. Alternatively, it’s possible that you submitted a credit claim that the IRS is taking longer to review. This year, on the other hand, the most likely explanation for a delayed tax refund is that you filed a paper tax return instead. As a result of the COVID-19 outbreak, there was a further backlog of tax returns to deal with.

See also:  Where Do I Sign My 1040 Tax Return? (Best solution)

Of course, the reasons for a delayed tax refund that existed before to the coronavirus epidemic may still be relevant today.

Take the time to develop a complete financial strategy that goes beyond taxes and other financial obligations.

How Long It Takes the IRS to Process a Tax Refund

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) typically issues a refund within 21 days of “accepting” a tax return. If you file your return electronically, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) may take up to three days to process your return. If you want to ship your return, it may take an extra three weeks (the IRS has to manually enter your return into the system first). If you choose to receive your refund in the form of a check rather than a direct transfer, you should factor one additional week into your time estimate.

The Internal Revenue Service claimed it intended to issue more than 90 percent of refunds within 21 days of e-filing 2020 tax returns (which will be filed in 2021).

This was, of course, before the coronavirus epidemic struck and health regulations forced the closure of offices across the country, including the IRS.

According to the IRS, the typical tax return in 2020 will be $2,500.

Nevertheless, according to the National Taxpayer Advocate, the IRS finished the extended tax season with a “backlog of more than 35 million individual and business income tax returns that require manual processing,” which means that IRS employees must conduct an additional review before a refund can be processed.

For the sake of comparison, the tax season in 2021 began on February 12. This means that the earliest day taxpayers received a refund in the prior year was February 26 for direct deposits and March 5 for paper checks (see chart below).

How Can I Track My IRS Refund?

If you are still anticipating a tax return, you may use the IRS Where’s My Refund service to check on the status of your 2021 income tax refund. Taxpayers will be required to provide personal information such as their Social Security number or Individual Taxpayer Identification Number, as well as the status of their tax return and the amount of money they anticipate to receive as a refund. Taxpayers can also check on the status of their refunds using the IRS2Go smartphone application. You will also be able to make tax payments and receive free tax assistance using the app (as long as you qualify).

The IRS TREAS 449 indicates that your refund has been lowered in order to settle a tax liability with the government.

If a taxpayer fails to submit any needed forms or schedules, he or she may be compelled to file an amended return.

Reasons for a Tax Refund Delay

There is no one cause for a tax refund to be held up by the Internal Revenue Service. On the contrary, there are a variety of distinct conditions that might influence how long it takes you to get your refund from Uncle Sam. As an example, you may have made a mistake on your tax return, input the incorrect bank account information for the refund, filed your return too soon, or any number of other reasons. We’ve included numerous typical reasons why your tax return can be delayed in the section below.

You Claim Certain Credits

If you submit your tax return early and claim the earned income tax credit (EITC) or the extra child tax credit (ACTC), you will have to wait a little longer for your refund to be processed. According to the legislation, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) must wait until February 15 before issuing refunds to individuals who claimed either of the two credits. President’s Day, as well as bank processing periods, might cause your refund to be delayed even longer. If the hold is placed on your application because you filed before the middle of February, there is no need to be concerned.

Alternatively, if you filed later than that, the IRS may have issues or request further information, in which case you should get a letter outlining what it required in order to proceed.

feature (available on the IRS website).

Filing Early or Late

Early filers may have to wait a long time for refunds to be processed. One explanation for this might be that the IRS is still in the midst of implementing adjustments to its procedures. Updated security measures or procedure improvements owing to changes in the tax code are examples of what may be included. If the IRS has to update or make modifications, it will most likely not do so until right before tax season. If you submit your taxes early in the tax season, your refund may be delayed as a result of the high volume of requests received by the IRS at this time.

Similarly, towards the end of tax season, the same is true. The vast majority of taxpayers either file as soon as they are able or wait until the last minute before the tax day deadline to do so. It will take some time to go through a large number of results.

New Security Measures

In today’s society, identity theft is a serious threat to people’s safety. The Internal Revenue Service maintains stringent security measures in order to fight the danger. Some security precautions will force the Internal Revenue Service to lengthen the time it takes to process tax returns (and refunds). If the Internal Revenue Service thinks that someone has attempted to steal your identity (by submitting a false tax return), your return may be delayed. You would then have to wait until the IRS has completed its investigation and has determined that you are who you claim to be before filing your tax return.

  • This will cause a delay in the processing of your refund, but it is only a security measure.
  • Because of the additional security measures, several state governments have also said that they will take longer to process tax returns in the future.
  • For example, typically, Alabama has not begun giving refunds until the first week of March.
  • If you’re looking for information on where your state return is, check out this post on where your state refund is.

You Filed a Paper Return

As previously stated, the Internal Revenue Service often takes longer to process paper returns than it does to process electronically submitted taxes. That means you will have to wait longer for your return—and considerably longer if you want your refund in the form of a check. If you file a paper return by certified mail, the Internal Revenue Service will take longer to complete your return and issue a refund. Speaking of paper returns, you will need to file any amended returns (1040X) as a paper return in order to be eligible for an extension.

Even if you file electronically, if you want to get your refund in the form of a physical check, you will have to wait a little longer.

As would cause your refund to be delayed in the same way that sending a refund to the incorrect bank account would cause it to be delayed.

Mistakes on Your Return

If you file an incomplete return, or if you make any mistakes on your tax return, the Internal Revenue Service will take longer to process your refund. Any possible reimbursement will be delayed as a result of this. Mistakes might include erroneous mathematical calculations or inaccurate personal data entry. With the help of a tax filing service, such as TurboTax, you can reduce the likelihood of mathematical mistakes on your tax return. The program will take care of the calculations for you.

  1. Consider the following scenario: you manually entered the information from your W-2.
  2. If there are any problems with your tax return, the IRS will notify you immediately.
  3. You may be able to avoid the hassle of having to file an updated return as a result of this.
  4. Consider the following scenario: you are filing a joint tax return with your spouse and you enter his or her Social Security number wrongly (SSN).

The remainder of the information on your return may be valid, but the IRS may not be able to verify it since the SSN of your spouse does not match the SSN on your return.

Incorrect Bank Info

The vast majority of taxpayers now get their refunds via direct deposit into their bank accounts. You should always double-check your account number and bank routing number after providing them. It is no one’s intention to lose out on a refund because it was sent to the incorrect bank account. If you made a mistake when entering your account information, there are a few options available. If you haven’t received your return from the IRS yet, you can request that they suspend the direct transfer.

  1. and 7 p.m.
  2. Alternatively, if the IRS has already delivered the payment, you will need to contact the banking institution to make arrangements.
  3. The Internal Revenue Service will subsequently give you a printed check for your refund.
  4. With Form 3911, you authorize the Internal Revenue Service to contact the financial institution on your behalf and seek to collect your refund.
  5. After the first trace is completed, banks have 90 days to reply to the Internal Revenue Service’s request for information.
  6. Your final option, if the bank does not reply, is to file a civil lawsuit against the financial institution and/or the owner of the account into which your return was placed.

You Have Outstanding Debt

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has the right to garnish your tax return if you owe certain types of obligations. Withholding your wages in order to use them for anything else is known as wage garnishment. The IRS will garnish your return for a variety of reasons, some of which are as follows:

  • It is possible for the IRS to garnish your tax refund if you owe certain types of obligations. (Wage garnishment is the process of withholding money from you in order to use it for anything else.) The IRS will garnish your return for a variety of reasons, some of which are listed here.

In the event that the IRS withholds your refund, you will get a notification explaining why the IRS took this decision. If you believe you were not obligated to pay that obligation, you will need to file a dispute with the agency that received the money.

Bottom Line

There are a variety of reasons why you could be experiencing a delay in receiving your tax return. Some of the explanations will not necessitate any more effort on your behalf. This is the case if you have claimed specific credits or if you have filed your tax return at specific periods. Filing a paper return or obtaining your refund in the form of a paper check will also cause a delay. Other possible reasons for a delay include making a mistake or omitting information on your return. In this situation, you will get a letter from the Internal Revenue Service.

It is your responsibility to locate the money if you requested a direct deposit but gave inaccurate bank information to the financial institution. In any event, the IRS2Go app or internet tool is the most convenient method to check on the status of your return.

Tips for Making the Most of Your Refund

  • Finding a quality financial advisor does not have to be a difficult endeavor. Your financial adviser links you with up to three other financial advisors in your region using SmartAsset’s free service, and you may interview your advisor matches at no cost to determine which one is the best fit for you. If you’re ready to locate a financial adviser who can assist you in achieving your financial objectives, get started right away. If you do not have any immediate bills to pay off, you may opt to deposit your refund directly into your bank account. Alternatively, you may hunt for a high-interest savings account. You may put your return toward retirement by obtaining the maximum interest rate available. Even if it doesn’t seem particularly enjoyable, it’s critical to guarantee that you can spend your golden years doing anything you like.

iStock/LPETTET, iStock/anyaberkut, and iStock/AntonioGuillem are credited with the images. Derek Silva, CEPF® (Certified Environmental Professional). Derrick Silva is on a mission to make personal finance more accessible to the general public. He contributes to SmartAsset by writing on a number of personal financial subjects and serving as a retirement and credit card specialist. A member of the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing, Derek also has the title of Certified Educator in Personal Finance® (CEPF®) and is an expert in personal finance.

Derek wants readers to take away from his work the following message: “Don’t forget that money is only a tool to help you achieve your objectives and live the lifestyle you choose.”

Where’s My Refund? Top 5 Reasons It’s Been Delayed

Updated for Tax Year 2021 / October 16, 2021 @ 12:40 a.m. on October 16, 2021 OVERVIEW When you receive your federal tax return, it is a joyful occasion. The majority of taxpayers receive their return within 21 days after filing, however it is possible that your check may not arrive in the mail or that your refund will not be transferred into your bank account as soon as you would like. The majority of the time, delays in collecting tax refunds are caused by circumstances outside your control.

1. Silly typos

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) will take notice if you misspell your name or enter your Social Security number (SSN) incorrectly or if you file a return for someone else with the erroneous Social Security number (SSN). Such mistakes might be caused by sloppy handwriting, but they can also be caused by being in a hurry. These types of typos are included on the IRS’s list of typical taxpayer errors, and any one of them is sufficient to cause your return to be delayed.

2. Math mistakes

Tax returns contain a large number of mathematical computations, and the trickle-down hypothesis is in effect. If you make a single calculation error, such as erroneously adding deductions instead of removing them, the arithmetic error will cascade down to subsequent computations, resulting in errors on your tax return. Double-check your calculations to avoid making mistakes and the delays that might result from them. Instead, file your return electronically and let reputable software do the computations for you.

3. More than one filing status

Are you:Married? Do you have children? Divorced? Are you the head of household? You could assume that several of these descriptions apply, but that is not the way the tax system works in practice. You may only choose one filing status at a time. Questions on the status of a filing do not merely request personal information.

Your tax filing requirements, basic deductions, and tax amounts are all determined by your tax status. It pays to be familiar with the various status options and to select the most appropriate one for your situation; you may find that you receive your refund more quickly as a result.

4. Incorrect line entries

When you fill out your tax papers by hand, it’s simple to make a mistake and enter the wrong numbers on the wrong pages. Even though it may appear to be a minor detail, if you unintentionally put your alimony received amount one line off the line, it will appear as business income on your tax return. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) will understandably be perplexed because you will most likely be missing additional documents for company revenue and will postpone processing your tax return until the situation is rectified.

See also:  Where To Send Massachusetts Tax Return? (Solved)

5. Early or last-minute tax filing

If you submit your taxes too early, the IRS may not be able to process certain of your tax forms because they have not been completed for handling yet. As a result, your refund will be delayed since the IRS will not process a return until their software is ready to handle all of the required tax documents. However, submitting paperwork at the last minute might be just as difficult. If you file your tax return right before the deadline, you’ll be considered a member of the great swarm of last-minute filers.

Best tip: file an electronic return

In addition to preventing numerous frequent taxpayer mistakes that cause refund delays, including as illegible writing, math errors, and entering information on the wrong lines, electronic filing (e-filing) also speeds up your return even if you haven’t made any mistakes. Paper returns are handled by hand, and the procedure typically takes between four and six weeks to complete. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) issued a warning to taxpayers in 2018 about delays in processing paper returns, stating that the minimum turnaround time might be as long as seven weeks.

Remember, with TurboTax, we’ll ask you a few easy questions about your life and assist you in filling out all of the necessary tax paperwork.

All you need to know is yourself

Provide straightforward answers to a few easy questions about your life, and TurboTax Free Edition will take care of the rest. Simple tax returns are all that are required. In the preceding article, generalist financial information intended to educate a broad part of the public is provided; however, customized tax, investment, legal, and other business and professional advice is not provided. Whenever possible, you should get counsel from an expert who is familiar with your specific circumstances before taking any action.

Some taxpayers have already received their tax refunds. Here’s how to make sure yours isn’t delayed

Despite the fact that tax season 2022 just began a week ago, several people claim to have already gotten their refunds from the Internal Revenue Service. Some social media users on Reddit and Twitter have reported that they have already received direct deposit payouts from banks such as Chime, Wells Fargo, and other financial institutions. Many of these people claim to have filed their tax returns on or around Jan. 24, the first day that returns were accepted by the IRS, and to have had relatively simple returns, though some do have dependents and have claimed the half of the child tax credit that was not paid in advance last year, according to the IRS.

Despite his desire to remain anonymous due to privacy concerns, Marlon says he and his wife want to use their return, which amounts to a few thousand dollars, to put toward a down payment and relocation fees for their first home, which they hope to purchase later this summer.

“Knowing that we will receive our refund in eight days this year gives us piece of mind knowing that we can proceed with our property purchase as planned.”

How to get your refund faster

The IRS has cautioned that a backlog of returns from last year, combined with a personnel deficit, might cause delays in processing returns this year. The IRS has stated that the rapid returns are welcome news. In general, the agency strives to issue reimbursements within 21 days after receiving the request. The IRS should presumably be able to complete your return more quickly if it is as straightforward as possible. The greater the number of credits you claim, the longer it may take for you to obtain a refund.

  • Additionally, the IRS anticipates that some taxpayers may make mistakes when claiming the stimulus funds that were not received and the other half of their child tax credit that was not received.
  • Other possible causes for a delayed refund include sending a paper return or not having your account set up for automatic direct deposit.
  • The quickest approach to ensure that you receive your refund as soon as possible is to file online as soon as possible and request direct deposit.
  • The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) handles returns on a first-come, first-served basis.
  • Don’t miss out on:
  • According to a CPA, there are three ways that’savvy’ cryptocurrency investors may ‘actively utilize the tax system’ to their advantage: This is your final chance to receive your $1,400 stimulus check before the end of the tax season. The start of tax season is today. Here are some reasons why you should file as soon as possible: The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) advises that your tax return may be delayed this year.

Your tax refund might be delayed this year, the IRS warns

It was with a caution that the Internal Revenue Service announced the start of tax filing season on Jan. 24: file early since the agency anticipates difficulties in processing returns and issuing refunds this year. According to IRS Commissioner Chuck Rettig, “we are unable to provide the level of service and enforcement that our taxpayers and tax system deserve and require.” We want to continue to accomplish everything we can with the resources at our disposal in 2022, because IRS personnel want to do more.

However, for a variety of reasons, it is possible that it will take longer this year.

That’s hundreds of thousands of dollars higher than the normal yearly backlog.

Aside from that, the agency continues to be understaffed, with the majority of that employees dealing with Covid-related tax adjustments such as the third economic impact payment and the child tax credit payments.

If you file your federal tax return online early — remember, filers may submit their federal tax forms starting on January 24 — and select direct deposit, you will receive your refund the quickest. In its statement, the agency stated that returns are processed on a first-come, first-served basis.

A challenging time

If you expect to get a tax refund, the most popular piece of advise is to submit your tax return as soon as possible after receiving it. There is no longer any justification for allowing the government to keep your money. The filing of your early tax return will be delayed for certain filers this year, due to a variety of factors, including new regulations, identity theft, and others. During the last few years, the number of cases of identity theft involving taxes has increased dramatically. In order to mitigate the risk of financial loss as a result of identity theft, Congress approved legislation requiring the Internal Revenue Service to postpone delivering refunds to those who claim certain deductions (the ones most likely used by identity thieves).

In particular, a large number of first-time filers will have difficulty dealing with concerns relating to the Advance Child Tax Credit.

The unfortunate reality is that many honest people may have their tax returns delayed by many weeks as a result of this.

To be more specific, you may check out our projected tax refund calendar to find out when you can expect to get your tax return.

Advance Child Tax Credit Reconciliation

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) began delivering Child Tax Credit payments to qualified families on a monthly basis last year in an effort to provide more cash to families in need. As a consequence, almost 35 million families throughout the United States began getting this assistance. Please note that this additional payment was essentially an advance on your child tax credit for fiscal year 2020-22! As a consequence, you’ll need to reconcile any payments you’ve made, and you may find that you owe the IRS a refund or that you’re entitled to more funds.

In addition to keeping this letter with your tax records, you may need to refer to it when submitting your 2021 tax return during the 2022 tax filing season, if you received an advance Child Tax Credit payment.

Therefore, we believe that many early filers may have their tax returns held up at the IRS as a result of the new Child Tax Credit, which was just implemented.

IRS Staffing

Early tax filers are expected to experience significant delays as a result of the IRS’s personnel shortage. The explanation is straightforward: because of the epidemic, many IRS employees will be forced to stay at home or become ill, causing delays. Considering that the IRS is still behind on processing mail and tax returns from the year 2021, we might expect delays in the processing of tax returns. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) will launch e-File on January 24, 2022, in the year 2022. The IRS, on the other hand, stated in their notification that they were experiencing severe manpower shortages and that there was the risk for delays.

After months and months of work last year, the Internal Revenue Service is still behind schedule with regard to processing postal returns and responding to other correspondence.

Everything that requires the attention of a real human being is going to be delayed as a result of the pandemic’s staffing shortage. For the most up-to-date information, please see our Tax Refund Calendar.

Delays For EITC and Child Tax Credit

A crook’s strategy is to file as many tax returns as possible in the shortest amount of time. You see, the IRS operates on a first-come, first-served basis when it comes to processing requests. If someone else files your tax return in your name before you do, and then steals your refund, they are the ones who have won the race. For the government, they will end up paying you the right return, but they will also have lost the money that was diverted to criminals in the first place. The simple truth is that they are delaying your tax return because they do not want to incur any further financial losses.

If you’ve been a victim of identity theft, you’ll have to submit a slew of paperwork to the Internal Revenue Service in order to get the identity theft issue fixed.

It’s a lengthy procedure that is not always straightforward.

The purpose of this exercise is to determine whether or not two tax returns have been submitted for the same individual.

What Types Of Tax Returns Does This Impact?

However, it is crucial to highlight that not all tax returns are being delayed as a result of this new legislation. Only those tax returns that contain the following tax credits are being kept for examination:

  • The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and the Additional Child Tax Credit (ACTC) are two of the most popular tax credits.

Because they are what are known as Refundable Tax Credits, these are most likely the tax credits that criminals take advantage of the most. This implies that even if you do not owe any taxes as a result of having a low or moderate income, you may be eligible for a refund for these tax credits. If you’re a criminal wanting to make as much money as possible, you’ll almost certainly want to submit a tax return that includes these tax credits. Low and moderate income tax payers, on the other hand, would have to wait longer for their tax returns than they did in past years as a result of this change.

How Long Do I Have To Wait For My Refund?

So, how long do you expect my tax return to be delayed? It all depends on the situation. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) continues to estimate that 90 percent of taxpayers will get their refunds within 21 days. If you file early, the Internal Revenue Service will hold your refund until February 15, after which it will begin processing your return. As a result, you may experience a delay until the middle or end of February. Using information from previous years, we’ve created a projected tax refund schedule that we feel is quite accurate.

If you want to get a head start on your taxes, have a look at our recommendations for the best tax software for first-time taxpayers. Have you found that your tax refund has been delayed as a result of this new law?

Filed your taxes? How to check your income tax refund status

The IRS strongly advises submitting your return online and using direct deposit in order to get your refund as quickly as possible. Angela Lang is a contributor to CNET. Now that the Internal Revenue Service is processing tax returns for the year 2021, tax refunds should be arriving in the mail shortly for individuals who submitted their forms correctly. However, how will you know when your money will be sent to you? Using IRS software, you can keep track of the status of your tax refund. Because of the COVID-19 epidemic, the Internal Revenue Service expects to see a significant increase in the number of tax returns it processes this year.

“Filing a paper tax return this year will result in a prolonged refund delay,” IRS Commissioner Chuck Rettig stated in a statement issued on January 24.

We’ll go through how to monitor your return online using the Where’s My Refund?

Find out how to set up an online IRS account, how to claim the remainder of your child tax credit money, how to file your taxes for free, and the ten tax changes that might affect the size of your return this year in our tax information section.

How long will it take for my tax refund to arrive?

Tax refunds are typically sent within three weeks by the Internal Revenue Service, but some taxpayers may have to wait a little longer to get their cash. In the event that there are any mistakes, or if you made a claim for the earned income tax credit or the child tax credit, you may have to wait a long time. A problem with your return’s processing can be resolved “depending on how quickly and accurately you respond, as well as the ability of IRS staff who have been trained and who are working under social distancing requirements to complete the processing of your return,” according to the Internal Revenue Service website.

If you filed your tax return by mail, the Internal Revenue Service estimates that it will take between six and eight weeks for your tax refund to arrive once it has been processed.

This means that if it takes the IRS the full 21 days to issue your return check and your bank the full five days to post it, you might be out of pocket for a total of 26 days before receiving your refund.

What money will be included with my tax refund this year?

Tax refunds are normally sent within three weeks by the Internal Revenue Service, although some taxpayers may have to wait a little longer to get their cash. You may have to wait a long time if there are any mistakes, or if you applied for an earned income tax credit or a child tax credit claim. Depending on how promptly and precisely you reply to a problem, and the capacity of IRS personnel educated and operating under social distancing criteria to finish the processing of your return, according to the IRS website, the issue’s resolution may take weeks or months.

It might take up to eight weeks for your tax refund to arrive if you filed your return by mail, according to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).

This means that if it takes the IRS the full 21 days to issue your return check and your bank the full five days to post it, you may be out of pocket for a total of 26 days before receiving your refund check.

Why could my tax refund be delayed?

The following are some of the reasons why your income tax refund may be delayed:

  • There are mistakes on your tax return
  • It’s a work in progress
  • It is suspected that your reimbursement is the result of identity theft or fraud. The earned income tax credit or the supplementary child tax credit was applied for on your behalf. Your return requires additional examination
  • The injured spouse allocation form (Form 8379(PDF)) is included in your return, and it might take up to 14 weeks to be processed.
See also:  How Do You Get A Copy Of Your Tax Return? (Question)

A mistake has been made on your tax return. It’s a work in progress; it’s not finished. Identity theft or fraud may have occurred with your refund. The earned income tax credit or the supplementary child tax credit was applied for on your behalf; A second look at your return is required. The injured spouse allocation form (Form 8379(PDF)) is included in your return, and it may take up to 14 weeks to be processed.

How to use the Where’s My Refund? tool

The IRS tracker tools require you to enter some personal information, including your Social Security number or Individual Taxpayer Identification Number, your filing status (single, married, head of household), and the amount of the refund in whole dollars that you can find on your tax return in order to check on the status of your 2021 income tax refund. Ensure that at least 24 hours have passed (or up to four weeks if you returned your item through mail) before beginning the refund tracking process.

  • directs you to theGet Refund Statuspage where you may fill up your personal information before pressing the Submit button.
  • If this is the case, you may be required to validate your personal tax information and try again.
  • The Internal Revenue Service now provides a smartphone app, called IRS2Go, that allows you to monitor the status of your tax refund.
  • Whether or not your return has been received, authorized, and dispatched will be visible to you.
  • This tool is updated overnight by the IRS, so if you don’t see a change in your status after 24 hours or longer, check again the following day.
  • In order to find out where your tax refund is, go to Where’s My Refund?
  • If you are seeking for information on earlier years’ returns, go to yourIRS online account for further information.
  • The IRS2Go smartphone app allows you to check on the status of your refund.

What do these IRS tax refund statuses mean?

The IRS tracker tools require you to enter some personal information, including your Social Security number or Individual Taxpayer Identification Number, your filing status (single, married, head of household), and the amount of the refund in whole dollars that you can find on your tax return in order to track down the status of your 2021 income tax refund. Before you begin monitoring your refund, wait at least 24 hours (or up to four weeks if you mailed your return) after you received it. The IRS tool Where’s My Refund?

  • In the event that you input your information correctly, you will be sent to a page that displays the current status of your refund.
  • Even if everything appears to be accurate, you will need to provide the date on which you filed your taxes, along with the option of either filing electronically or by paper.
  • In addition to English and Spanish, it is also accessible in French and German.
  • Your Social Security number, filing status, and anticipated refund amount will be required in order to log in.
  • The timeframe by which you should expect to receive your money is determined when your return and refund have been accepted.
  • and enter the year of your most recent tax refund that the IRS has on file.
  • You’ll be able to view the total amount you owe, your payment history, crucial information about your most recent tax return, notices you’ve received from the IRS, and the address that the IRS has on file if you create your own personalized account.

The IRS2Go smartphone app allows you to monitor the status of your refund. Photo courtesy of CNET contributor James Martin

  • Received: The Internal Revenue Service has received and is working to process your tax return. When your return is approved, the IRS has processed your information and confirmed the amount of your refund, if you are due one. Sent: Your refund has been processed and is on its way to your bank, either as a direct deposit or as a printed check in the mail. (If you’ve moved, you can find out how to update your address on file here.)

Can I contact the IRS for more help?

While you might try phoning the IRS to see whether your situation has changed, the agency’s live phone support is severely restricted. You should avoid filing a second tax return or contacting the Internal Revenue Service to inquire about the status of your return. For further information, the Internal Revenue Service directs visitors to theLet Us Help Youpage on its website. It also recommends that taxpayers seek in-person assistance from Taxpayer Assistance Centers. You can contact your local IRS office or call to schedule an appointment at 844-545-5640 to schedule an appointment.

Although the chances of receiving live help are minimal, the IRS recommends that you contact the agency directly only if it has been more than 21 days since you paid your taxes online or if the Where’s My Refundtool directs you to do so.

I see an IRS TREAS 310 transaction on my bank statement. What does it mean?

If you get your tax return by direct deposit, the transaction may be identified as IRS TREAS 310 on your bank statement. It is sufficient to identify the transaction as a refund from a previously filed tax return in the form of an electronic payment by referring to the 310 code (direct deposit). Tax refunds can also be found in the description section by searching forTAX REF. Seeing a 449 instead of a 310 indicates that your return has been reduced to account for past-due debt.

Why would my tax refund come in the mail instead of direct deposit?

For transactions involving the Internal Revenue Service (IRS TREAS 310), you may see the transaction code IRS TREAS 310 listed in your bank account. It is sufficient to identify the transaction as a refund from a previously filed tax return in the form of an electronic payment by referencing the 310 code in the description (direct deposit). Tax refunds can also be found in the description area by searching forTAX REFin the field labeled This indicates that your refund has been reduced by 449 instead of 310 since you owe money.

7 Reasons You Haven’t Received Your Tax Refund

You’re undoubtedly wondering how quickly your tax return will come once you’ve filed for the year – especially if you have big plans for it. Generally speaking, according to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), nine out of ten taxpayers who file online may expect to get their refunds within 21 days. But what happens if that amount of time has passed and your refund is still nowhere to be found? Here’s what you need to know and do to be prepared.

Key Takeaways

  • According to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), taxpayers who file their returns electronically may expect to get their refunds within 21 days. Where’s My Refund? is a page maintained by the Internal Revenue Service that allows you to track the progress of your refund. Identity theft and tax fraud are two examples of situations in which you may not have received your refund due to simple math mistakes on your tax return. Alternatively, it might just indicate an abnormally large amount of processing at the IRS.

First, Check Your Refund Status Online

If you’re wondering where your return has gone, you may start by visiting the IRS’s Where’s My Refund? page to see if it has arrived yet. According to the IRS, you will need the following items in order to do so:

  • Starting with the Where’s My Return? page on the IRS’s website, you may determine whether or not your refund has arrived. According to the IRS, you will need the following items to complete this task:

You may check your refund status by clicking on the Check My Refund Status button, entering the necessary information, and receiving results. Unfortunately, this tool does not give a great deal of information on the reasons for your money being delayed.

It may suggest you to contact the Internal Revenue Service, from which you should be able to obtain further information. However, the IRS advises against calling until one of the following two conditions is met:

  • It’s been at least 21 days since you e-filed
  • The Where’s My Refund? page hasn’t shown yet. The IRS should be contacted, according to an internet tool.

7 Reasons for a Late Tax Refund

There are a variety of factors that might delay the processing and receipt of your tax refund. As an example, if you filed your tax return too early or waited until the last minute, your refund might be delayed. Suppose you tried to submit your return in January and there was a last-minute change to the tax law that resulted in a mistake on your return that delayed down the processing of your return. Similar to this, waiting until the very last minute to file your return may result in a lengthier wait for your refund if the IRS is experiencing a backlog due to an unusually large number of returns being processed at once.

The quickest way to make a claim and receive your refund is to do so electronically using the internet.

1. Your tax return contains inaccurate information

Numerical errors or other issues on your tax return might cause your refund to be processed more slowly. When an issue is identified, your return is flagged for human review, which means that an IRS employee will have to go through it one more time to determine where the problem occurred. This can cause the processing time to be extended by several days or even weeks.

2. Your return is incomplete

In addition, filing an incomplete return may result in an IRS review, which may result in a lengthier wait time for your refund. For example, if you submitted a paper return and forgot to include a critical piece of information, such as your Social Security number, or if you omitted to sign your tax papers, the IRS will not process your return until those items are crossed off the list.

3. You’re a victim of tax fraud

Persons who use your personal information to file a fake tax return and claim a refund in your name are known as tax fraudsters. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) found more than 450,000 bogus refund claims for the 2020 tax-filing season, with more than 44,000 of them being linked to identity theft. If you believe you are a victim of tax-related identity theft, you can file a complaint with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).

4. Your refund was sent to the wrong bank

The quickest method to receive your refund is to file your return electronically. This is especially true if you’re utilizing direct deposit to receive your refund. That, of course, implies that you provide the correct account numbers for your financial institution. If you made a clerical error and entered the wrong routing or account number, your money may be transferred to someone else’s account. If your refund is mistakenly deposited into someone else’s bank account, you will need to contact the bank directly in order to recover your funds.

5. You claimed certain tax credits

Tax credits are reductions in your tax liabilities that are equal to the amount of the credit received. Certain tax credits, such as the earned income credit (EIC) and the extra child tax credit, are frequently scrutinized by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) because persons falsely claim these benefits.

The fact that you claimed either credit might be the reason why your refund hasn’t yet been processed and sent.

6. You amended your return

Dollar-for-dollar, tax credits help you to minimize your tax obligation. Due to people claiming some tax credits illegally, the IRS frequently scrutinizes certain tax credits, such as the earned income credit (EIC) and the extra child tax credit. The fact that you claimed either credit might be the reason why your refund hasn’t yet been processed and sent.

7. Your refund has been offset to pay a debt

If you owe certain obligations, such as unpaid child support, unpaid state taxes, or outstanding federal student loans, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) may deduct the amount owing from your return. A note from the Bureau of the Fiscal Service of the United States Department of Treasury will inform you as to why your refund has been offset and which government agency is due money as a result of this action. You have the right to file a dispute with the agency that processed your return if you believe you owe money.

COVID-19 Impact

Depending on your situation, the IRS may deduct the amount of your refund from your refund if you owe certain obligations, such as unpaid child support, unpaid state taxes, or late federal student loans. If your refund is offset, you will get a notification from the United States Treasury’s Bureau of the Fiscal Service informing you of the reason for the offset and the agency to which the debt is owing. You have the right to file a dispute with the agency that issued your refund if you believe you have been wrongfully charged.

FAQs

According to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), 90 percent of taxpayers who submit their returns online will get their refunds within 21 days after filing their returns. Having said that, a large number of refunds can be delayed for an extended period of time, sometimes dramatically. Due to a lack of sufficient manpower, COVID-19 has produced a considerable backlog for 2020 results.

What Are the Most Common Reasons for Delay?

When a tax return is incomplete or inaccurate, it may be necessary to file an amended return. Other reasons for a tax refund delay include tax fraud, claiming tax credits, owing certain debts for which the government may take part or all of your refund, and sending your refund to the wrong bank because you entered the wrong routing number on your return.

How Do I Check My Refund Status?

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has a Where’s My Refund? page on its website. Go to this website and enter your Social Security number (SSN) or individual taxpayer identification number (ITIN), filing status, and precise amount of your refund to receive an update on where your refund is in the pipeline.

The Bottom Line

The reasons listed above are some of the most prevalent causes of a delayed refund. A refund might also be delayed if the package is misplaced in the mail. Another risk is that your reimbursement will be taken from your mailbox without your knowledge. And a government shutdown, such as the one that occurred in January 2019, might result in a lengthier wait time for your return to be completed and your refund to be processed and mailed to you.

If the Where’s My Refund? tool is unable to provide you with any answers, you can seek assistance from your local IRS office. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) may be able to track down your refund to determine what happened to it and provide a replacement if necessary.

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